Background: Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) after previous aortic open surgical repair (OSR) are challenging clinical scenarios. Redo-OSR is technically demanding, and standard endovascular repair is unavailable due to visceral vessel involvement. Fenestrated and branched endografts (FB-EVAR) are effective options to treat TAAAs in high surgical risk patients but dedicated studies on the FB-EVAR outcomes in patients with TAAAs with previous OSR are not available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of previous OSR on TAAAs FB-EVAR outcomes. Methods: Between 2010 and 2016, all TAAAs undergoing FB-EVAR were prospectively evaluated, retrospectively categorized in two groups, and then compared: group A–primary TAAAs and group B–TAAAs after previous OSR (abdominal, thoracic, or thoracoabdominal aneurysm). Early end points were technical success (absence of type I-III endoleak, target visceral vessel loss, conversion to OSR, intraoperative mortality), spinal cord ischemia (SCI), and 30-day mortality. Follow-up end points were survival, target visceral vessel patency, and freedom from reinterventions. Results: Sixty-two patients (male: 74%; age: 72 ± 7 years) with 1 (1%) extent I, 14 (23%) extent II, 24 (39%) extent III, and 23 (37%) extent IV TAAA underwent FB-EVAR. The mean TAAA diameter and total target visceral vessels were 65 ± 13 mm and 226, respectively. Ninety branches and 136 fenestrations were planned. Thirty cases (48%) were clustered in group A and 32 (52%) in group B. Patients in group A and group B had similar preoperative clinical and morphologic characteristics, except for female sex (group A: 40% vs group B: 13%; P = .02). Technical success was 92% (group A: 90% vs group B: 94%; P = .6), SCI 5% (group A: 10% vs group B: 0%; P = .1) and 30-day mortality 5% (group A: 10% vs group B: 0%; P = .1). The mean follow-up was 17 ± 11 months with a total survival of 86%, 80%, and 60% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively and no differences in the two groups (group A: 83%, 83%, and 67% vs group B: 88%, 78%, and 55% respectively; P = .96). There was no late TAAA-related mortality. Target visceral vessel patency was 91%, 91%, and 91% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively (group A: 87%, 87%, and 87% vs group B: 95%, 95%, and 95%; P = .25). Freedom from reinterventions was 90%, 87%, and 87%, at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, and it was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (group A: 83%, 76%, and 76% vs group B: 96%, 96%, and 96% respectively; P = .002). Conclusions: Previous open surgery repair does not significantly affect the early outcomes of FB-EVAR in TAAA, with encouraging results in terms of technical success, SCI, mortality, and lower reinterventions rate at midterm follow-up.

Impact of previous open aortic repair on the outcome of thoracoabdominal fenestrated and branched endografts

Gallitto, Enrico
;
Faggioli, Gianluca
;
Mascoli, Chiara
;
Pini, Rodolfo
;
Ancetti, Stefano
;
Vacirca, Andrea
;
Stella, Andrea
;
Gargiulo, Mauro
2018

Abstract

Background: Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) after previous aortic open surgical repair (OSR) are challenging clinical scenarios. Redo-OSR is technically demanding, and standard endovascular repair is unavailable due to visceral vessel involvement. Fenestrated and branched endografts (FB-EVAR) are effective options to treat TAAAs in high surgical risk patients but dedicated studies on the FB-EVAR outcomes in patients with TAAAs with previous OSR are not available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of previous OSR on TAAAs FB-EVAR outcomes. Methods: Between 2010 and 2016, all TAAAs undergoing FB-EVAR were prospectively evaluated, retrospectively categorized in two groups, and then compared: group A–primary TAAAs and group B–TAAAs after previous OSR (abdominal, thoracic, or thoracoabdominal aneurysm). Early end points were technical success (absence of type I-III endoleak, target visceral vessel loss, conversion to OSR, intraoperative mortality), spinal cord ischemia (SCI), and 30-day mortality. Follow-up end points were survival, target visceral vessel patency, and freedom from reinterventions. Results: Sixty-two patients (male: 74%; age: 72 ± 7 years) with 1 (1%) extent I, 14 (23%) extent II, 24 (39%) extent III, and 23 (37%) extent IV TAAA underwent FB-EVAR. The mean TAAA diameter and total target visceral vessels were 65 ± 13 mm and 226, respectively. Ninety branches and 136 fenestrations were planned. Thirty cases (48%) were clustered in group A and 32 (52%) in group B. Patients in group A and group B had similar preoperative clinical and morphologic characteristics, except for female sex (group A: 40% vs group B: 13%; P = .02). Technical success was 92% (group A: 90% vs group B: 94%; P = .6), SCI 5% (group A: 10% vs group B: 0%; P = .1) and 30-day mortality 5% (group A: 10% vs group B: 0%; P = .1). The mean follow-up was 17 ± 11 months with a total survival of 86%, 80%, and 60% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively and no differences in the two groups (group A: 83%, 83%, and 67% vs group B: 88%, 78%, and 55% respectively; P = .96). There was no late TAAA-related mortality. Target visceral vessel patency was 91%, 91%, and 91% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively (group A: 87%, 87%, and 87% vs group B: 95%, 95%, and 95%; P = .25). Freedom from reinterventions was 90%, 87%, and 87%, at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, and it was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (group A: 83%, 76%, and 76% vs group B: 96%, 96%, and 96% respectively; P = .002). Conclusions: Previous open surgery repair does not significantly affect the early outcomes of FB-EVAR in TAAA, with encouraging results in terms of technical success, SCI, mortality, and lower reinterventions rate at midterm follow-up.
Gallitto, Enrico*; Faggioli, Gianluca; Mascoli, Chiara; Pini, Rodolfo; Ancetti, Stefano; Vacirca, Andrea; Stella, Andrea; Gargiulo, Mauro
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/670711
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