The production of wine grapes in upstate New York (USA) is limited by diseases that are promoted by the cool and sometimes rainy climate. A breeding program has been introducing disease resistance from related species into the cultivated stock. Previous work has indicated that such resistance may be based on biochemical reactions rather than on a hypersensitive reaction. We therefore undertook metabolic profiling of amino acids and phenolic compounds in berries from collections of susceptible and resistant hybrids over the course of berry development to determine whether any of these compounds could be causal in disease resistance. The most abundant amino acids were GLN, ARG, PRO and THR. The amount of amino acids in ripe berries was from 3 to 4.7-fold higher compared to earlier stages. The concentrations of total phenolics were variable through the season with no consistent trend between susceptible and resistant fruits. Notable changes in phenolic compounds, especially anthocyanins, were recorded, especially during the ripening phase, when phenolics and anthocyanins increased following veraison. The most abundant phenolic compounds were catechin and epi-catechin; the most abundant anthocyanin was delphinidin-3-glucoside, which had a slightly greater concentration in resistant fruit at harvest, followed by malvidin-3-glucoside and petunidin-3-glucoside. The content of both amino acids and phenolic compounds in white-fruited parent cv. Horizon was equal to several-fold lower than the progeny plants, whether susceptible or resistant, depending on the harvest time. While no major differences between susceptible and resistant lines were found, multivariate analyses showed that it is possible to discriminate the susceptibility or resistance of grapes by analyzing their combined concentrations of amino acids, polyphenols and anthocyanins. Therefore, these compounds are influenced by the resistance capacity of grapes and could be used as a chemical fingerprint of this ability. However, it is likely that these are associations with disease resistance rather than their cause as no major consistent differences were noted.

Seasonal changes in amino acids and phenolic compounds in fruits from hybrid cross populations of American grapes differing in disease resistance

Tassoni, Annalisa
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Zappi, Alessandro
Investigation
;
Melucci, Dora
Investigation
;
2019

Abstract

The production of wine grapes in upstate New York (USA) is limited by diseases that are promoted by the cool and sometimes rainy climate. A breeding program has been introducing disease resistance from related species into the cultivated stock. Previous work has indicated that such resistance may be based on biochemical reactions rather than on a hypersensitive reaction. We therefore undertook metabolic profiling of amino acids and phenolic compounds in berries from collections of susceptible and resistant hybrids over the course of berry development to determine whether any of these compounds could be causal in disease resistance. The most abundant amino acids were GLN, ARG, PRO and THR. The amount of amino acids in ripe berries was from 3 to 4.7-fold higher compared to earlier stages. The concentrations of total phenolics were variable through the season with no consistent trend between susceptible and resistant fruits. Notable changes in phenolic compounds, especially anthocyanins, were recorded, especially during the ripening phase, when phenolics and anthocyanins increased following veraison. The most abundant phenolic compounds were catechin and epi-catechin; the most abundant anthocyanin was delphinidin-3-glucoside, which had a slightly greater concentration in resistant fruit at harvest, followed by malvidin-3-glucoside and petunidin-3-glucoside. The content of both amino acids and phenolic compounds in white-fruited parent cv. Horizon was equal to several-fold lower than the progeny plants, whether susceptible or resistant, depending on the harvest time. While no major differences between susceptible and resistant lines were found, multivariate analyses showed that it is possible to discriminate the susceptibility or resistance of grapes by analyzing their combined concentrations of amino acids, polyphenols and anthocyanins. Therefore, these compounds are influenced by the resistance capacity of grapes and could be used as a chemical fingerprint of this ability. However, it is likely that these are associations with disease resistance rather than their cause as no major consistent differences were noted.
Tassoni, Annalisa; Zappi, Alessandro; Melucci, Dora; Reisch, Bruce I.; Davies, Peter J.*
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/656396
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