The seasonal and daily growth of sweet chestnut (C. sativa Mill.) husks have been studied in a commercial orchard in Monterenzio (Bologna, Italy). The seasonal growth pattern in the maximum and minimum diameter of 20 husks were measured every 7 days from 30 days after full bloom (DAFB) - corresponding at the beginning of June - to a week before harvest (120 DAFB). The absolute and relative growth rate (AGR, RGR) have also been calculated. Growth of 6 husks was monitored from the 4th to the 11th of August 2017 through very precise fruit gauges, connected to a custom-built, Arduino-based data logger, which was monitored through a wireless network (AWSN). The 6 husks were selected on 3 trees (2 husks per tree) and their diameters were recorded every 15 minutes for the entire week. Temperature (0C) and daily precipitation (mm/day) were sourced from a close (2 km) meteorological station belonging to ARPAE (Regional agency for environmental control). The husk exhibited a seasonal diameter growth pattern resembling a double sigmoid. AGR responded positively to rainfalls, as no irrigation was provided. Interestingly, daily husk growth started mid-morning and continued till dark (from 10:00 to 21:00), followed by shrinkage during night-time. This pattern of growth appears opposite if compared to other fruit species as Prunus persica L. or Malus domestica Bork., which exhibit growth during the last part of the day/night and shrinkage/no growth during the day. Our data show a quick increase (within the following 24 hours) in husk growth rate after a rainfall event. These preliminary data show the need for further studies on C. sativa physiology and their potential impact on improving irrigation practices for this intriguing crop.

Castagno: un primo approccio alla fisiologia di crescita del riccio.

Perulli G. D.
;
Bresilla K.;Morandi B.;Boini A.;Manfrini L.;Corelli-Grappadelli L.
2018

Abstract

The seasonal and daily growth of sweet chestnut (C. sativa Mill.) husks have been studied in a commercial orchard in Monterenzio (Bologna, Italy). The seasonal growth pattern in the maximum and minimum diameter of 20 husks were measured every 7 days from 30 days after full bloom (DAFB) - corresponding at the beginning of June - to a week before harvest (120 DAFB). The absolute and relative growth rate (AGR, RGR) have also been calculated. Growth of 6 husks was monitored from the 4th to the 11th of August 2017 through very precise fruit gauges, connected to a custom-built, Arduino-based data logger, which was monitored through a wireless network (AWSN). The 6 husks were selected on 3 trees (2 husks per tree) and their diameters were recorded every 15 minutes for the entire week. Temperature (0C) and daily precipitation (mm/day) were sourced from a close (2 km) meteorological station belonging to ARPAE (Regional agency for environmental control). The husk exhibited a seasonal diameter growth pattern resembling a double sigmoid. AGR responded positively to rainfalls, as no irrigation was provided. Interestingly, daily husk growth started mid-morning and continued till dark (from 10:00 to 21:00), followed by shrinkage during night-time. This pattern of growth appears opposite if compared to other fruit species as Prunus persica L. or Malus domestica Bork., which exhibit growth during the last part of the day/night and shrinkage/no growth during the day. Our data show a quick increase (within the following 24 hours) in husk growth rate after a rainfall event. These preliminary data show the need for further studies on C. sativa physiology and their potential impact on improving irrigation practices for this intriguing crop.
Perulli, G.D., Bresilla, K., Morandi, B., Boini, A., Manfrini, L., Corelli-Grappadelli, L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/651942
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