Foodborne outbreaks caused by Salmonella are often attributed to the pork consumption. Salmonella contamination of retail pork is directly linked to the Salmonella prevalence on farm. In UK, approximately 40% of breeding pigs are kept outdoors. Aim of this study was to investigate the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of Salmonella in one outdoor pig farm. Three sampling visits were carried out at monthly intervals to an outdoor farm consisting of two fields, one left empty of pigs for more than 2 years (field A) while the second (field B) was occupied by pigs during the first visit only. Faeces from wild bird droppings, environmental samples and pig faeces were tested for Salmonella. Salmonella spp. was isolated from environmental samples also in field A that had not been occupied by pigs more than 2 years. Interestingly, the wild bird population accessing the fields increased considerably once the pigs had left the farm and the proportion of Salmonella positive wild bird droppings increased over time with 7.4%, 15.8% and 44.3% at the first, second and third visit, respectively. The levels of Salmonella identified in some of the wild bird droppings were unusually high (105 - 106 CFU/g) suggesting that Salmonella was actively replicating in the gastrointestinal tract of these birds. Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium DT193 was the predominant serotype isolated in pigs as well as in wild bird droppings and the environment, suggesting that the pigs were the original source of infection, as this serovar is typically associated with pigs.

Role of wild birds and environmental contamination in the epidemiology of Salmonella infection in an outdoor pig farm

DE LUCIA, ALESSIA;Ostanello, Fabio;
2018

Abstract

Foodborne outbreaks caused by Salmonella are often attributed to the pork consumption. Salmonella contamination of retail pork is directly linked to the Salmonella prevalence on farm. In UK, approximately 40% of breeding pigs are kept outdoors. Aim of this study was to investigate the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of Salmonella in one outdoor pig farm. Three sampling visits were carried out at monthly intervals to an outdoor farm consisting of two fields, one left empty of pigs for more than 2 years (field A) while the second (field B) was occupied by pigs during the first visit only. Faeces from wild bird droppings, environmental samples and pig faeces were tested for Salmonella. Salmonella spp. was isolated from environmental samples also in field A that had not been occupied by pigs more than 2 years. Interestingly, the wild bird population accessing the fields increased considerably once the pigs had left the farm and the proportion of Salmonella positive wild bird droppings increased over time with 7.4%, 15.8% and 44.3% at the first, second and third visit, respectively. The levels of Salmonella identified in some of the wild bird droppings were unusually high (105 - 106 CFU/g) suggesting that Salmonella was actively replicating in the gastrointestinal tract of these birds. Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium DT193 was the predominant serotype isolated in pigs as well as in wild bird droppings and the environment, suggesting that the pigs were the original source of infection, as this serovar is typically associated with pigs.
De Lucia, Alessia; Rabie, André; Smith, Richard P.; Davies, Rob; Ostanello, Fabio; Ajayi, Dolapo; Petrovska, Liljana; Martelli, Francesca
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/650422
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