The geographical isolation due to the ice-sheets expansion in cold-climatic stages (e.g. Last Glacial Maximum, LGM) has been traditionally involved to explain the present patchy distribution of some cold-adapted plant and arthropod species on peripheral mountain ranges; more recently, the areal contraction during warm-climatic stages (e.g. Holocene Climate Optimum) was also called into question. Recent studies ontheInner Alps demonstrated the role of ice-relatedlandforms (glaciers and rock glaciers) as habitat for cold-adaptedspecies. Since such landformmay represent potentialwarm-stage refugia, the comparison of their occurrence, that of cold-stagerefugia and that of cold-adapted species may shed light on the events driving present species distribution.In this work we aimed to explain the present distribution of cold-adapted plant and animal species on a peripheral mountain range(Orobian Alps: Italy). We focused on ten species: 5 plants (Viola comollia, Androsace alpina, Artemisia genipi, Ranunculus glacialisand Saxifraga oppositifolia); 3 ground beetles(Oreonebria castanea, O. lombardaandO. soror tresignore) and2 spiders (Coelotes pickardi tirolensisand Drassodes heeri) living on debris-featured landforms above 2000 m a.s.l.Some of these species are endemic while others show wide distribution, but they share the same main ecological requirements.We compared by GIS-approach 574 records of plants and arthropods (379 plants, 54 ground beetles and 141 spiders) with the distribution of cold-stage refugia (summits emerging from the LGM ice-sheet)and potential warm-stage refugia (highest summits and 80 glaciers and 27 intactrock glaciers). The results highlighted two rather different distributional patterns: 1) plant species seems more linked to warm-stage refugia,beingmainly distributed where highest peaks occur and around glaciers and intact rock glaciers, and absent even at favorable altitude where the overall elevation of the chain is lower; 2) arthropod species seem linkedto cold-stage refugia, being widely distributed in most of the summit emerging from the LGM ice-sheet.Our study suggests the potential role of both cold-and warm-stage refugia on the current distribution of cold-adapted plants and arthropods on peripheral mountain ranges. This result could help to a better interpretation of the results obtained by phylogeographicalstudies performed on taxa with distribution limited to peripheral mountain range.

Distributional pattern of cold-adapted plants and arthropods in a peripheral mountain range: cold- and warm-stage refugia should be considered

Scotti R;
2016

Abstract

The geographical isolation due to the ice-sheets expansion in cold-climatic stages (e.g. Last Glacial Maximum, LGM) has been traditionally involved to explain the present patchy distribution of some cold-adapted plant and arthropod species on peripheral mountain ranges; more recently, the areal contraction during warm-climatic stages (e.g. Holocene Climate Optimum) was also called into question. Recent studies ontheInner Alps demonstrated the role of ice-relatedlandforms (glaciers and rock glaciers) as habitat for cold-adaptedspecies. Since such landformmay represent potentialwarm-stage refugia, the comparison of their occurrence, that of cold-stagerefugia and that of cold-adapted species may shed light on the events driving present species distribution.In this work we aimed to explain the present distribution of cold-adapted plant and animal species on a peripheral mountain range(Orobian Alps: Italy). We focused on ten species: 5 plants (Viola comollia, Androsace alpina, Artemisia genipi, Ranunculus glacialisand Saxifraga oppositifolia); 3 ground beetles(Oreonebria castanea, O. lombardaandO. soror tresignore) and2 spiders (Coelotes pickardi tirolensisand Drassodes heeri) living on debris-featured landforms above 2000 m a.s.l.Some of these species are endemic while others show wide distribution, but they share the same main ecological requirements.We compared by GIS-approach 574 records of plants and arthropods (379 plants, 54 ground beetles and 141 spiders) with the distribution of cold-stage refugia (summits emerging from the LGM ice-sheet)and potential warm-stage refugia (highest summits and 80 glaciers and 27 intactrock glaciers). The results highlighted two rather different distributional patterns: 1) plant species seems more linked to warm-stage refugia,beingmainly distributed where highest peaks occur and around glaciers and intact rock glaciers, and absent even at favorable altitude where the overall elevation of the chain is lower; 2) arthropod species seem linkedto cold-stage refugia, being widely distributed in most of the summit emerging from the LGM ice-sheet.Our study suggests the potential role of both cold-and warm-stage refugia on the current distribution of cold-adapted plants and arthropods on peripheral mountain ranges. This result could help to a better interpretation of the results obtained by phylogeographicalstudies performed on taxa with distribution limited to peripheral mountain range.
PRIMO CONGRESSO CONGIUNTO SOCIETA’ ITALIANA DI ECOLOGIA, UNIONE ZOOLOGICA ITALIANA, SOCIETA’ ITALIANA DI BIOGEOGRAFIA
Tampucci D, Gobbi M, Pantini P, Cabrini E, Muzzolon IA, Bernasconi M, Mangili F, Scotti R, Tantardini D, Caccianiga M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/631669
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