OBJECTIVE: This review and meta-analysis aim at updating a previous meta-analysis carried out by Waters et al. on the efficacy of interventions aimed at preventing childhood obesity and at identifying predictors of outcome. METHODS: Using an ad-hoc search string, PubMed database was searched for studies assessing body mass index reduction associated with programmes lasting ≥12 weeks in overweight and obese children aged 2-18 years. Studies designed for children with eating disorders or relevant comorbidities were excluded. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were classified according to patient age (<6, 6-12 and 13-18 years), and intervention type (physical activity, diet or both), setting (educational, family or both) and duration (≤1 or >1 year). The search was also extended to other databases. Hand-searching techniques were also applied. The Cochrane 'risk of bias' was applied for quality assessment. RESULTS: Seventy-two studies were meta-analysed. Overall, the best results were achieved by programmes combining diet and physical activity (n = 39). With regard to the setting, programmes involving both school and family and lasting ≤1 year were the most efficacious for 6- to 12-year-old children (n = 26); family-based-only interventions were also effective in children <6 years old (n = 2), although results have to be interpreted cautiously because of the small number of patients enrolled and the high study heterogeneity. In 13- to 18-year-old patients, interventions delivered at school (n = 8) were substantially unsuccessful. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions for childhood obesity prevention should include both diet and physical activity, be preferentially targeted towards school age children and involve both the school and family setting. However, because of the important methodological limitations associated with currently available literature, additional studies are needed to draw definite conclusions.

Effectiveness of educational and lifestyle interventions to prevent paediatric obesity: systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized and non-randomized controlled trials

Gori, D;GUARALDI, FEDERICA;Cinocca, S;Rucci, P;Fantini, M. P.
2017

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This review and meta-analysis aim at updating a previous meta-analysis carried out by Waters et al. on the efficacy of interventions aimed at preventing childhood obesity and at identifying predictors of outcome. METHODS: Using an ad-hoc search string, PubMed database was searched for studies assessing body mass index reduction associated with programmes lasting ≥12 weeks in overweight and obese children aged 2-18 years. Studies designed for children with eating disorders or relevant comorbidities were excluded. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were classified according to patient age (<6, 6-12 and 13-18 years), and intervention type (physical activity, diet or both), setting (educational, family or both) and duration (≤1 or >1 year). The search was also extended to other databases. Hand-searching techniques were also applied. The Cochrane 'risk of bias' was applied for quality assessment. RESULTS: Seventy-two studies were meta-analysed. Overall, the best results were achieved by programmes combining diet and physical activity (n = 39). With regard to the setting, programmes involving both school and family and lasting ≤1 year were the most efficacious for 6- to 12-year-old children (n = 26); family-based-only interventions were also effective in children <6 years old (n = 2), although results have to be interpreted cautiously because of the small number of patients enrolled and the high study heterogeneity. In 13- to 18-year-old patients, interventions delivered at school (n = 8) were substantially unsuccessful. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions for childhood obesity prevention should include both diet and physical activity, be preferentially targeted towards school age children and involve both the school and family setting. However, because of the important methodological limitations associated with currently available literature, additional studies are needed to draw definite conclusions.
OBESITY SCIENCE & PRACTICE
Gori, D; Guaraldi, F; Cinocca, S; Moser, G; Rucci, P; Fantini, M. P.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
gori_2017.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipo: Versione (PDF) editoriale
Licenza: Licenza per Accesso Aperto. Creative Commons Attribuzione - Non commerciale - Non opere derivate (CCBYNCND)
Dimensione 860.63 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
860.63 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Supporting Information.zip

accesso aperto

Tipo: File Supplementare
Licenza: Licenza per accesso libero gratuito
Dimensione 322.19 kB
Formato Zip File
322.19 kB Zip File Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/625340
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 13
  • Scopus 23
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 25
social impact