Recent progress in dissecting the molecular paracrine circuits of cancer and stromal cells in bone metastases (BM) are offering new options to improve current merely palliative approach. The study of tumor-stroma metabolic interplay may further ameliorate this scenario. In this context, we demonstrated that highly glycolytic MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, that form osteolytic BM in vivo, release a large amount of lactate at a significantly higher level than MCF7 cells. Thus, we speculated that lactate released from carcinoma cells is uptaken and metabolically used by osteoclasts, the key players of osteolysis associated with BM. First, we demonstrated that the release of lactate at the bone site is mediated by monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), as revealed by immunostaining and MCT4 localization at the plasma membrane of tumor cells in mouse model of BM and in human tissue sections of BM. Then, we showed that in vitro lactate is uptaken by osteoclasts to be used as a fuel for the oxidative metabolism of osteoclasts, ultimately enhancing Type I collagen resorption. The passive transport of lactate into osteoclasts was mediated by MCT1: MCT1 expression is significantly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation and Type I collagen resorption is significantly impaired when osteoclasts are treated with 7-(N-benzyl-N-methylamino)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylic acid, an MCT-1 inhibitor. Together, these data demonstrate that lactate released by glycolytic breast carcinoma cells in the bone microenvironment promotes the formation of osteolytic lesions, and provide the rationale for further studies on the use of MCT1 targeting as a novel therapeutic approach in advanced cancer patients with BM.

MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells fuel osteoclast metabolism and activity: A new rationale for the pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastases

Lemma, Silvia;Di Pompo, Gemma;Baldini, Nicola;Avnet, Sofia
2017

Abstract

Recent progress in dissecting the molecular paracrine circuits of cancer and stromal cells in bone metastases (BM) are offering new options to improve current merely palliative approach. The study of tumor-stroma metabolic interplay may further ameliorate this scenario. In this context, we demonstrated that highly glycolytic MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, that form osteolytic BM in vivo, release a large amount of lactate at a significantly higher level than MCF7 cells. Thus, we speculated that lactate released from carcinoma cells is uptaken and metabolically used by osteoclasts, the key players of osteolysis associated with BM. First, we demonstrated that the release of lactate at the bone site is mediated by monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), as revealed by immunostaining and MCT4 localization at the plasma membrane of tumor cells in mouse model of BM and in human tissue sections of BM. Then, we showed that in vitro lactate is uptaken by osteoclasts to be used as a fuel for the oxidative metabolism of osteoclasts, ultimately enhancing Type I collagen resorption. The passive transport of lactate into osteoclasts was mediated by MCT1: MCT1 expression is significantly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation and Type I collagen resorption is significantly impaired when osteoclasts are treated with 7-(N-benzyl-N-methylamino)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylic acid, an MCT-1 inhibitor. Together, these data demonstrate that lactate released by glycolytic breast carcinoma cells in the bone microenvironment promotes the formation of osteolytic lesions, and provide the rationale for further studies on the use of MCT1 targeting as a novel therapeutic approach in advanced cancer patients with BM.
Lemma, Silvia; Di Pompo, Gemma; Porporato, Paolo E.; Sboarina, Martina; Russell, Shonagh; Gillies, Robert J.; Baldini, Nicola; Sonveaux, Pierre; Avnet, Sofia*
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/624662
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