The distribution and morphological characteristics of the shelves around Salina Island have been analyzed and integrated with observations from onshore geological field studies in order to improve knowledge about its evolution, and to demonstrate how shelf width/depth can be used as proxies for reconstructing the development of the volcanic edifice. Insular shelves form essentially through marine erosion of volcanic centres during stages of reduced or inactive volcanism, and are representative of their original extension. Shelves having larger widths (commonly > 1000 m) and deeper edges (over 125 m depth) experienced wave erosion during successive cycles of sea-level fluctuations and subsidence after their formation, thus being indicative of a relatively older age of the eroded volcanic centres. Accordingly, we document offshore Salina the occurrence of presently submerged and largely dismantled volcanic centres (namely Pizzo Capo North and Fossa delle Felci South) predating the oldest subaerial products exposed on the adjacent coastal sectors. These offshore centres have subsided after their erosion and are no more documented on land. Furthermore, the finding of the largest and deepest shelf around the subaerial remnants of Pizzo di Corvo volcanic edifice allows relating it to an earlier stage of evolution of Salina, shedding light on contradictory radiometric ages on land. Narrower shelves (commonly < 1000 m) indicate a lower evolutionary maturity with respect to the larger ones; they are, in fact, formed along the sectors of the island where younger volcanic products are exposed, such as to the north and south of Monte dei Porri. The depths of the shelf edges, mostly at − 110 m (in the areas not affected by later mass-wasting), suggest that these coastal sectors were relatively stable or even slightly uplifted after erosion during Last Glacial Maximum. Moreover, several interacting factors (such as lithology of volcanic products, fetch and exposure to prevailing storms, degree of submarine erosion, relative sea level changes) have been taken into account to explain the morphological setting of the different shelf and coastal sectors of Salina. On the whole, our results show the importance of integrated field and marine studies to unravel the geological evolution of insular volcanoes and to obtain inferences on their vertical mobility.

Morpho-bathymetric and seismo-stratigraphic analysis of the insular shelf of Salina (Aeolian archipelago) to unveil its Late-Quaternary evolution.

ROMAGNOLI, CLAUDIA;RICCHI, ALESSANDRO;LUCCHI, FEDERICO;TRANNE, CLAUDIO ANTONIO;
2018

Abstract

The distribution and morphological characteristics of the shelves around Salina Island have been analyzed and integrated with observations from onshore geological field studies in order to improve knowledge about its evolution, and to demonstrate how shelf width/depth can be used as proxies for reconstructing the development of the volcanic edifice. Insular shelves form essentially through marine erosion of volcanic centres during stages of reduced or inactive volcanism, and are representative of their original extension. Shelves having larger widths (commonly > 1000 m) and deeper edges (over 125 m depth) experienced wave erosion during successive cycles of sea-level fluctuations and subsidence after their formation, thus being indicative of a relatively older age of the eroded volcanic centres. Accordingly, we document offshore Salina the occurrence of presently submerged and largely dismantled volcanic centres (namely Pizzo Capo North and Fossa delle Felci South) predating the oldest subaerial products exposed on the adjacent coastal sectors. These offshore centres have subsided after their erosion and are no more documented on land. Furthermore, the finding of the largest and deepest shelf around the subaerial remnants of Pizzo di Corvo volcanic edifice allows relating it to an earlier stage of evolution of Salina, shedding light on contradictory radiometric ages on land. Narrower shelves (commonly < 1000 m) indicate a lower evolutionary maturity with respect to the larger ones; they are, in fact, formed along the sectors of the island where younger volcanic products are exposed, such as to the north and south of Monte dei Porri. The depths of the shelf edges, mostly at − 110 m (in the areas not affected by later mass-wasting), suggest that these coastal sectors were relatively stable or even slightly uplifted after erosion during Last Glacial Maximum. Moreover, several interacting factors (such as lithology of volcanic products, fetch and exposure to prevailing storms, degree of submarine erosion, relative sea level changes) have been taken into account to explain the morphological setting of the different shelf and coastal sectors of Salina. On the whole, our results show the importance of integrated field and marine studies to unravel the geological evolution of insular volcanoes and to obtain inferences on their vertical mobility.
Romagnoli, C.; Casalbore, D.; Ricchi, A.; Lucchi, F.; Quartau, R.; Bosman, A.; Tranne C., A.; Chiocci F., L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/617744
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