Context. The next generation of galaxy surveys will provide cluster catalogues probing an unprecedented range of scales, redshifts, and masses with large statistics. Their analysis should therefore enable us to probe the spatial distribution of clusters with high accuracy and derive tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters and the dark energy equation of state. However, for the majority of these surveys, redshifts of individual galaxies will be mostly estimated by multiband photometry which implies non-negligible errors in redshift resulting in potential difficulties in recovering the real-space clustering. Aims: We investigate to which accuracy it is possible to recover the real-space two-point correlation function of galaxy clusters from cluster catalogues based on photometric redshifts, and test our ability to detect and measure the redshift and mass evolution of the correlation length r0 and of the bias parameter b(M,z) as a function of the uncertainty on the cluster redshift estimate. Methods: We calculate the correlation function for cluster sub-samples covering various mass and redshift bins selected from a 500 deg2 light-cone limited to H < 24. In order to simulate the distribution of clusters in photometric redshift space, we assign to each cluster a redshift randomly extracted from a Gaussian distribution having a mean equal to the cluster cosmological redshift and a dispersion equal to σz. The dispersion is varied in the range σ(z=0)=\frac{σz{1+z_c} = 0.005,0.010,0.030} and 0.050, in order to cover the typical values expected in forthcoming surveys. The correlation function in real-space is then computed through estimation and deprojection of wp(rp). Four mass ranges (from Mhalo > 2 × 1013h-1M⊙ to Mhalo > 2 × 1014h-1M⊙) and six redshift slices covering the redshift range [0, 2] are investigated, first using cosmological redshifts and then for the four photometric redshift configurations. Results: From the analysis of the light-cone in cosmological redshifts we find a clear increase of the correlation amplitude as a function of redshift and mass. The evolution of the derived bias parameter b(M,z) is in fair agreement with theoretical expectations. We calculate the r0-d relation up to our highest mass, highest redshift sample tested (z = 2,Mhalo > 2 × 1014h-1M⊙). From our pilot sample limited to Mhalo > 5 × 1013h-1M⊙(0.4 < z < 0.7), we find that the real-space correlation function can be recovered by deprojection of wp(rp) within an accuracy of 5% for σz = 0.001 × (1 + zc) and within 10% for σz = 0.03 × (1 + zc). For higher dispersions (besides σz > 0.05 × (1 + zc)), the recovery becomes noisy and difficult. The evolution of the correlation in redshift and mass is clearly detected for all σz tested, but requires a large binning in redshift to be detected significantly between individual redshift slices when increasing σz. The best-fit parameters (r0 and γ) as well as the bias obtained from the deprojection method for all σz are within the 1σ uncertainty of the zc sample.

Evolution of the real-space correlation function from next generation cluster surveys.vRecovering the real-space correlation function from photometric redshifts

CAPPI, ALBERTO;MARULLI, FEDERICO
2017

Abstract

Context. The next generation of galaxy surveys will provide cluster catalogues probing an unprecedented range of scales, redshifts, and masses with large statistics. Their analysis should therefore enable us to probe the spatial distribution of clusters with high accuracy and derive tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters and the dark energy equation of state. However, for the majority of these surveys, redshifts of individual galaxies will be mostly estimated by multiband photometry which implies non-negligible errors in redshift resulting in potential difficulties in recovering the real-space clustering. Aims: We investigate to which accuracy it is possible to recover the real-space two-point correlation function of galaxy clusters from cluster catalogues based on photometric redshifts, and test our ability to detect and measure the redshift and mass evolution of the correlation length r0 and of the bias parameter b(M,z) as a function of the uncertainty on the cluster redshift estimate. Methods: We calculate the correlation function for cluster sub-samples covering various mass and redshift bins selected from a 500 deg2 light-cone limited to H < 24. In order to simulate the distribution of clusters in photometric redshift space, we assign to each cluster a redshift randomly extracted from a Gaussian distribution having a mean equal to the cluster cosmological redshift and a dispersion equal to σz. The dispersion is varied in the range σ(z=0)=\frac{σz{1+z_c} = 0.005,0.010,0.030} and 0.050, in order to cover the typical values expected in forthcoming surveys. The correlation function in real-space is then computed through estimation and deprojection of wp(rp). Four mass ranges (from Mhalo > 2 × 1013h-1M⊙ to Mhalo > 2 × 1014h-1M⊙) and six redshift slices covering the redshift range [0, 2] are investigated, first using cosmological redshifts and then for the four photometric redshift configurations. Results: From the analysis of the light-cone in cosmological redshifts we find a clear increase of the correlation amplitude as a function of redshift and mass. The evolution of the derived bias parameter b(M,z) is in fair agreement with theoretical expectations. We calculate the r0-d relation up to our highest mass, highest redshift sample tested (z = 2,Mhalo > 2 × 1014h-1M⊙). From our pilot sample limited to Mhalo > 5 × 1013h-1M⊙(0.4 < z < 0.7), we find that the real-space correlation function can be recovered by deprojection of wp(rp) within an accuracy of 5% for σz = 0.001 × (1 + zc) and within 10% for σz = 0.03 × (1 + zc). For higher dispersions (besides σz > 0.05 × (1 + zc)), the recovery becomes noisy and difficult. The evolution of the correlation in redshift and mass is clearly detected for all σz tested, but requires a large binning in redshift to be detected significantly between individual redshift slices when increasing σz. The best-fit parameters (r0 and γ) as well as the bias obtained from the deprojection method for all σz are within the 1σ uncertainty of the zc sample.
Sridhar, Srivatsan; Maurogordato, Sophie; Benoist, Christophe; Cappi, Alberto; Marulli, Federico
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/600422
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