Abstract— The aim of this study concerns the observation over time of some young downy oak plants (Quercus pubescens Willd.), grown in a soil artificially contaminated with thallium, to determine i) thallium uptake and concentrations in individual parts (roots, trunks and leaves); ii) thallium transfer capacity from soil to plants; iii) the behavior of growth of affected plants by thallium contamination. The value of Bio-concentration Factor (BF) shows the ability of plants to accumulate and concentrate thallium from artificially contaminated soil. Values of BF greater than 1 explain the tendency of Quercus Pubescens Willd. to accumulate thallium in higher concentration than soil. The translocation factor (TF), calculated as the percentage ratio of thallium concentration in aerial parts to thallium concentration in roots, yet asserts a total transfer of thallium through the roots to aerial parts of the plants These data once again demonstrate the roots collapse in the fifth phase (200 days) and the lost of the ability to keep thallium in soil. The microbial biomass carbon was lower in contaminated soils compared to the controls, and the entity of reduction was proportional to depth. The upper layer showed a decline of microbial population of almost 70%, while in the latter end of soil microbial population was reduced of 30% compared to control.Simultaneously, variations of the enzyme activity in the soil samples showed an increase of arylsulphatase, cellulase and β-glucosidase activity but only in the latter part of top soil (10-15 cm) while other enzymes exhibited a remarkable reduction of their activity in both soil layers, compared to the control.

Thallium-transfer from artificially contaminated soil to young downy oak plants (Quercus pubescens Willd.)

VITTORI ANTISARI, LIVIA;FERRONATO, CHIARA;VIANELLO, GILMO
2016

Abstract

Abstract— The aim of this study concerns the observation over time of some young downy oak plants (Quercus pubescens Willd.), grown in a soil artificially contaminated with thallium, to determine i) thallium uptake and concentrations in individual parts (roots, trunks and leaves); ii) thallium transfer capacity from soil to plants; iii) the behavior of growth of affected plants by thallium contamination. The value of Bio-concentration Factor (BF) shows the ability of plants to accumulate and concentrate thallium from artificially contaminated soil. Values of BF greater than 1 explain the tendency of Quercus Pubescens Willd. to accumulate thallium in higher concentration than soil. The translocation factor (TF), calculated as the percentage ratio of thallium concentration in aerial parts to thallium concentration in roots, yet asserts a total transfer of thallium through the roots to aerial parts of the plants These data once again demonstrate the roots collapse in the fifth phase (200 days) and the lost of the ability to keep thallium in soil. The microbial biomass carbon was lower in contaminated soils compared to the controls, and the entity of reduction was proportional to depth. The upper layer showed a decline of microbial population of almost 70%, while in the latter end of soil microbial population was reduced of 30% compared to control.Simultaneously, variations of the enzyme activity in the soil samples showed an increase of arylsulphatase, cellulase and β-glucosidase activity but only in the latter part of top soil (10-15 cm) while other enzymes exhibited a remarkable reduction of their activity in both soil layers, compared to the control.
Vittori Antisari, Livia; Marinari, Sara; Ferronato, Chiara; Vianello, Gilmo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/589479
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