We report the present knowledge about RPHM21, a novel male-specific mitochondrial protein with a putative role in the paternal inheritance of sperm mitochondria in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, a species with doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria (DUI). We review all the available data on rphm21 transcription and translation, analyze in detail its female counterpart, RPHF22, discuss the homology with RPHM21, the putative function and origin, and analyze their polymorphism. The available evidence is compatible with a viral origin of RPHM21 and supports its activity during spermatogenesis. RPHM21 is progressively accumulated in mitochondria and nu- clei of spermatogenic cells, and we hypothesize it can influence mitochondrial inheritance and sex- ual differentiation. We propose a testable model that describes how the acquisition of selfish fea- tures by a mitochondrial lineage might have been responsible for the emergence of DUI, and for the evolution of separate sexes (gonochorism) from hermaphroditism. The appearance of DUI most likely entailed the invasion of at least 1 selfish element, and the extant DUI systems can be seen as resolved conflicts. It was proposed that hermaphroditism was the ancestral condition of bi- valves, and a correlation between DUI and gonochorism was documented. We hypothesize that DUI might have driven the shift from hermaphroditism to gonochorism, with androdioecy as transi- tion state. The invasion of sex-ratio distorters and the evolution of suppressors can prompt rapid changes among sex-determination mechanisms, and DUI might have been responsible for one of such changes in some bivalve species. If true, DUI would represent the first animal sex-determination system involving mtDNA-encoded proteins.

Mitochondrial selfish elements and the evolution of biological novelties.

MILANI, LILIANA;GHISELLI, FABRIZIO;PASSAMONTI, MARCO
2016

Abstract

We report the present knowledge about RPHM21, a novel male-specific mitochondrial protein with a putative role in the paternal inheritance of sperm mitochondria in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, a species with doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria (DUI). We review all the available data on rphm21 transcription and translation, analyze in detail its female counterpart, RPHF22, discuss the homology with RPHM21, the putative function and origin, and analyze their polymorphism. The available evidence is compatible with a viral origin of RPHM21 and supports its activity during spermatogenesis. RPHM21 is progressively accumulated in mitochondria and nu- clei of spermatogenic cells, and we hypothesize it can influence mitochondrial inheritance and sex- ual differentiation. We propose a testable model that describes how the acquisition of selfish fea- tures by a mitochondrial lineage might have been responsible for the emergence of DUI, and for the evolution of separate sexes (gonochorism) from hermaphroditism. The appearance of DUI most likely entailed the invasion of at least 1 selfish element, and the extant DUI systems can be seen as resolved conflicts. It was proposed that hermaphroditism was the ancestral condition of bi- valves, and a correlation between DUI and gonochorism was documented. We hypothesize that DUI might have driven the shift from hermaphroditism to gonochorism, with androdioecy as transi- tion state. The invasion of sex-ratio distorters and the evolution of suppressors can prompt rapid changes among sex-determination mechanisms, and DUI might have been responsible for one of such changes in some bivalve species. If true, DUI would represent the first animal sex-determination system involving mtDNA-encoded proteins.
CURRENT ZOOLOGY
Milani, L.; Ghiselli, F.; Passamonti, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/580138
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