We propose a methodology for the description of the secondary structure of proteins, based on assigning a chirality parameter to short aminoacid sequences according to their arrangement in space at a certain time. We validated the method on ideal and crystalline structures, showing that it can assign secondary structures and that this assignment is robust with respect to random conformational perturbations. From the values of the index and its pattern along a sequence it is possible to recognize many structural motifs of a protein, and in particular poly-L-proline II left-handed helices, often not detected by secondary structure assignment algorithms. Assigning an instantaneous chirality index to the fragments also allows the dynamics to be studied. With this purpose, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in water for selected hemoglobin (110 ns) and immunoglobulin antigen fragments (50 ns), showing the capability of the chiral index in identifying the stable secondary structure elements, as well as in following their time evolution and conformational changes during the trajectory.

A chirality index for identifying protein secondary structures

PIETROPAOLO, ADRIANA;MUCCIOLI, LUCA;BERARDI, ROBERTO;ZANNONI, CLAUDIO
2008

Abstract

We propose a methodology for the description of the secondary structure of proteins, based on assigning a chirality parameter to short aminoacid sequences according to their arrangement in space at a certain time. We validated the method on ideal and crystalline structures, showing that it can assign secondary structures and that this assignment is robust with respect to random conformational perturbations. From the values of the index and its pattern along a sequence it is possible to recognize many structural motifs of a protein, and in particular poly-L-proline II left-handed helices, often not detected by secondary structure assignment algorithms. Assigning an instantaneous chirality index to the fragments also allows the dynamics to be studied. With this purpose, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in water for selected hemoglobin (110 ns) and immunoglobulin antigen fragments (50 ns), showing the capability of the chiral index in identifying the stable secondary structure elements, as well as in following their time evolution and conformational changes during the trajectory.
A. Pietropaolo; L. Muccioli; R. Berardi; C. Zannoni
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/54523
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