Purpose To evaluate the effects of kinesiophobia on both phases immediately after surgery and the final results after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This study evaluated prospectively 101 patients (mean age 66 ± 8.0 years, 70 women and 31 men), 5 days after surgery, at 1, 6, 12 months, and at a mean final follow-up of 3.2 ± 0.7 years (2.0–4.2 years). Kinesiophobia was assessed with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK: Activity Avoidance—TSK1 and Harm—TSK2 subscales), and results were evaluated with range of motion, pain and function on 0–10 numeric rating scales, WOMAC and SF-12 (Physical and Mental subscales) scores. Results TSK1 was correlated with the acute postoperative pain measured at 5 days (p = 0.031), pain measured at 12 months (p = 0.018), patient perceived function at 12 months (p = 0.025), SF-12P at 6 months (p < 0.001), SF-12P and SF-12M at 12 months (p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively), and WOMAC at both 6 and 12 months of follow-up (p = 0.005 and p = 0.001). The effect of TSK 1 on the final WOMAC score was significant when corrected by age and sex (p = 0.049, η 2 = 0.041): the youngest female patients were affected even by moderate kinesiophobia levels. Conclusions Fear of pain and even more avoidance of movement are strongly correlated both with the acute postoperative pain perception and recovery after surgery up to 1 year, thus presenting a relevant clinical impact on the outcome after TKA. Moreover, this study showed that even though at longer follow-up its impact decreases, patients with higher levels of kinesiophobia may present a poorer final outcome, especially women. Level of evidence IV.

Patient kinesiophobia affects both recovery time and final outcome after total knee arthroplasty

FILARDO, GIUSEPPE;ROFFI, ALICE;MARCACCI, THOMAS;MARCACCI, MAURILIO
2016

Abstract

Purpose To evaluate the effects of kinesiophobia on both phases immediately after surgery and the final results after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This study evaluated prospectively 101 patients (mean age 66 ± 8.0 years, 70 women and 31 men), 5 days after surgery, at 1, 6, 12 months, and at a mean final follow-up of 3.2 ± 0.7 years (2.0–4.2 years). Kinesiophobia was assessed with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK: Activity Avoidance—TSK1 and Harm—TSK2 subscales), and results were evaluated with range of motion, pain and function on 0–10 numeric rating scales, WOMAC and SF-12 (Physical and Mental subscales) scores. Results TSK1 was correlated with the acute postoperative pain measured at 5 days (p = 0.031), pain measured at 12 months (p = 0.018), patient perceived function at 12 months (p = 0.025), SF-12P at 6 months (p < 0.001), SF-12P and SF-12M at 12 months (p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively), and WOMAC at both 6 and 12 months of follow-up (p = 0.005 and p = 0.001). The effect of TSK 1 on the final WOMAC score was significant when corrected by age and sex (p = 0.049, η 2 = 0.041): the youngest female patients were affected even by moderate kinesiophobia levels. Conclusions Fear of pain and even more avoidance of movement are strongly correlated both with the acute postoperative pain perception and recovery after surgery up to 1 year, thus presenting a relevant clinical impact on the outcome after TKA. Moreover, this study showed that even though at longer follow-up its impact decreases, patients with higher levels of kinesiophobia may present a poorer final outcome, especially women. Level of evidence IV.
KNEE SURGERY, SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY, ARTHROSCOPY
G. Filardo; A. Roffi; G. Merli; T. Marcacci; F. Berti Ceroni; D. Raboni; B. Bortolotti; L. De Pasqual; M. Marcacci
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/527914
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus 34
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 31
social impact