In the current study we examined the effects of early isolation rearing on cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in the dentate gyrus of the guinea pig. Animals were assigned to either a standard (control) or an isolated environment a few days after birth (P5-P6), taking advantage of the precocious independence from maternal care of the guinea pig. On P14-P17 animals received one daily bromodeoxyuridine injection, to label dividing cells, and were sacrificed either on P18, to evaluate cell proliferation or on P45, to evaluate cell survival and differentiation. In P18 isolated animals we found a reduced cell proliferation (-35%) compared to controls and a lower expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Though in absolute terms P45 isolated animals had less surviving cells, they showed no differences in survival rate and phenotype percent distribution compared to controls. Looking at the location of the new neurons, we found that while in control animals 76% of them had migrated to the granule cell layer, in isolated animals only 55% of the new neurons had reached this layer. Examination of radial glia cells of P18 and P45 animals by vimentin immunohistochemistry showed that in isolated animals radial glia cells were reduced in density and had less and shorter processes. Granule cell count revealed that P45 isolated animals had less (-42%) granule cells than controls. Results show that isolation rearing reduces hippocampal cell proliferation, likely by reducing BDNF expression and hampers migration of the new neurons to the granule cell layer, likely by altering density/morphology of radial glia cells. The large reduction in granule cell number following isolation rearing emphasizes the role of environmental cues as relevant modulators of neurogenesis.

Neonatal isolation impairs neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the guinea pig.

RIZZI, SIMONA;BIANCHI, PATRIZIA;GUIDI, SANDRA;CIANI, ELISABETTA;BARTESAGHI, RENATA
2007

Abstract

In the current study we examined the effects of early isolation rearing on cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in the dentate gyrus of the guinea pig. Animals were assigned to either a standard (control) or an isolated environment a few days after birth (P5-P6), taking advantage of the precocious independence from maternal care of the guinea pig. On P14-P17 animals received one daily bromodeoxyuridine injection, to label dividing cells, and were sacrificed either on P18, to evaluate cell proliferation or on P45, to evaluate cell survival and differentiation. In P18 isolated animals we found a reduced cell proliferation (-35%) compared to controls and a lower expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Though in absolute terms P45 isolated animals had less surviving cells, they showed no differences in survival rate and phenotype percent distribution compared to controls. Looking at the location of the new neurons, we found that while in control animals 76% of them had migrated to the granule cell layer, in isolated animals only 55% of the new neurons had reached this layer. Examination of radial glia cells of P18 and P45 animals by vimentin immunohistochemistry showed that in isolated animals radial glia cells were reduced in density and had less and shorter processes. Granule cell count revealed that P45 isolated animals had less (-42%) granule cells than controls. Results show that isolation rearing reduces hippocampal cell proliferation, likely by reducing BDNF expression and hampers migration of the new neurons to the granule cell layer, likely by altering density/morphology of radial glia cells. The large reduction in granule cell number following isolation rearing emphasizes the role of environmental cues as relevant modulators of neurogenesis.
Rizzi S.; Bianchi P.; Guidi S.; Ciani E.; Bartesaghi R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/41970
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