Communication to patients of information about their disease has become increasingly important in modern medicine, and particularly with chronic nonfatal disorders like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the subject is not adequately researched or understood. We studied the media and preferences for communication of information in a multi-national community-based inception cohort of European and Israeli patients with IBD and 10 years follow-up, using structured questionnaires categorizing demographics, disease status, current and preferred sources of information, use of electronic media, role of patients' associations, and satisfaction level. The 917 patients completing the questionnaire were derived from northern (60%) and southern (40%) countries. The mean age was 48.3 years (62% under 50 years); 51% were males; 67% had ulcerative colitis, 33% Crohn's disease. Sixty-six percent of patients designated the specialist as their primary source of information, 77% indicated satisfaction with their current information, and 65% reported not receiving information about medical treatment in the past year. Patient concerns were about new research into their illness (64%), medical treatments (58%), risks and complications (51%) and genetics (42%). Preferred sources of information were paper bulletin (76%), electronic media (30%) and international organization (79%). Diagnosis (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease), gender, education level and country impacted significantly on patients' choices. In providing health care information to patients with IBD their individual attitudes and preferences must be considered. There should be greater roles for IBD patients' associations and international IBD-research organizations, and an increasing use of electronic media.

Communication of information to patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A European Collaborative Study in a multinational prospective inception cohort

LALLI, PINA;
2008

Abstract

Communication to patients of information about their disease has become increasingly important in modern medicine, and particularly with chronic nonfatal disorders like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the subject is not adequately researched or understood. We studied the media and preferences for communication of information in a multi-national community-based inception cohort of European and Israeli patients with IBD and 10 years follow-up, using structured questionnaires categorizing demographics, disease status, current and preferred sources of information, use of electronic media, role of patients' associations, and satisfaction level. The 917 patients completing the questionnaire were derived from northern (60%) and southern (40%) countries. The mean age was 48.3 years (62% under 50 years); 51% were males; 67% had ulcerative colitis, 33% Crohn's disease. Sixty-six percent of patients designated the specialist as their primary source of information, 77% indicated satisfaction with their current information, and 65% reported not receiving information about medical treatment in the past year. Patient concerns were about new research into their illness (64%), medical treatments (58%), risks and complications (51%) and genetics (42%). Preferred sources of information were paper bulletin (76%), electronic media (30%) and international organization (79%). Diagnosis (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease), gender, education level and country impacted significantly on patients' choices. In providing health care information to patients with IBD their individual attitudes and preferences must be considered. There should be greater roles for IBD patients' associations and international IBD-research organizations, and an increasing use of electronic media.
2008
P. Politi;P. Bodini;M.G. Mortilla;M. Beltrami;G. Fornaciari;D. Formisano;P. Munkholm;L. Riis;F. Wolters;O. Hoie;K. Katsanos;C. O'Morain;M. Shuhaibar;P. Lalli;M. De Falco;S. Pereira;J. Freitas;S. Odes;R.W. Stockbrügger
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/398106
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 16
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 16
social impact