This paper will focus on the translation of video games, a topic which is now emerging as a specialised area of academic studies. Further, the business sector of software entertainment is expanding and requires a growing number of professional translators. Translating video games has strong ties to both software localisation and audiovisual translation, but displays its own original features requiring an ad hoc approach. This paper is based on personal work experience and on the theoretical framework provided by the integration of Game Studies, Translation Studies (TS), Audiovisual Translation (AVT) and the GILT model (Globalisation, Internationalisation, Localisation and Translation). In particular, the GILT model, encompassing project management and information technology, is useful to explain the nature and processing of electronic "moving" texts on a concrete and meta­textual dimension, thus laying the foundation for a new multidisciplinary approach, which moves away from the analysis of traditional textual supports. After defining this background, we will point out the heterogeneous reality of the game localisation modus operandi as well as the complex text genres and assets of video games (manual, on-screen text, subtitling/dubbing script, artwork, packaging and promotional material). TS make a contribution to the contextual application of the Skopos Theory and to the provision of a domesticating translational rationale, while AVT provides insights into relevant semiotic and analytical aspects regarding screen translation. Some examples will be provided which illustrate the most recurrent difficulties and translation strategies involved in the on-screen text, to the aim of highlighting the main linguistic, cultural and technical features. Finally, moving on from these considerations, a critical analysis of the actual localisation workflow points to the alienation and de-contextualisation of the localiser, who is set apart from audiovisual data and authoring information, thus resulting in his/her task being far less entertaining than expected.

Translation Studies and the challenge of video game translation

TARQUINI, GIANNA
2009

Abstract

This paper will focus on the translation of video games, a topic which is now emerging as a specialised area of academic studies. Further, the business sector of software entertainment is expanding and requires a growing number of professional translators. Translating video games has strong ties to both software localisation and audiovisual translation, but displays its own original features requiring an ad hoc approach. This paper is based on personal work experience and on the theoretical framework provided by the integration of Game Studies, Translation Studies (TS), Audiovisual Translation (AVT) and the GILT model (Globalisation, Internationalisation, Localisation and Translation). In particular, the GILT model, encompassing project management and information technology, is useful to explain the nature and processing of electronic "moving" texts on a concrete and meta­textual dimension, thus laying the foundation for a new multidisciplinary approach, which moves away from the analysis of traditional textual supports. After defining this background, we will point out the heterogeneous reality of the game localisation modus operandi as well as the complex text genres and assets of video games (manual, on-screen text, subtitling/dubbing script, artwork, packaging and promotional material). TS make a contribution to the contextual application of the Skopos Theory and to the provision of a domesticating translational rationale, while AVT provides insights into relevant semiotic and analytical aspects regarding screen translation. Some examples will be provided which illustrate the most recurrent difficulties and translation strategies involved in the on-screen text, to the aim of highlighting the main linguistic, cultural and technical features. Finally, moving on from these considerations, a critical analysis of the actual localisation workflow points to the alienation and de-contextualisation of the localiser, who is set apart from audiovisual data and authoring information, thus resulting in his/her task being far less entertaining than expected.
La ricerca nella comunicazione interlinguistica, Modelli teorici e metodologici
235
250
LINGUA, TRADUZIONE, DIDATTICA
Gianna, Tarquini
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/397713
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact