In the domain of self-recognition, voice is a critical feature for self/other distinction. The aim of this study was to explore if people have an implicit and/or explicit knowledge of their voice. A group of healthy participants were submitted to an implicit and an explicit self-voice recognition task. They listened to pairs of pre-recorded auditory stimuli (words or pseudowords) pronounced by themselves, by a familiar or an unfamiliar person. Afterwards, in the “Implicit task” participants had to judge whether the pair of stimuli were pronounced by same or different speakers; in the “Explicit task” they had to identify if one of the stimuli was or not their own voice. Results showed a difference between Implicit and Explicit tasks since participants were more accurate in implicit than explicit self voice-recognition. Moreover, in the Implicit task, participants had the same level of accuracy when they had to judge stimuli pronounced with self or others’ voice, whereas when an explicit voice-recognition was required, they were less accurate with self than with others’ voice.

Who is speaking? Implicit and explicit self and other voice recognition / Michela Candini;Elisa Zamagni;Angela Nuzzo;Francesco Ruotolo;Tina Iachini;Francesca Frassinetti. - In: BRAIN AND COGNITION. - ISSN 0278-2626. - ELETTRONICO. - 92:(2014), pp. 112-117. [10.1016/j.bandc.2014.10.001]

Who is speaking? Implicit and explicit self and other voice recognition

CANDINI, MICHELA;FRASSINETTI, FRANCESCA
2014

Abstract

In the domain of self-recognition, voice is a critical feature for self/other distinction. The aim of this study was to explore if people have an implicit and/or explicit knowledge of their voice. A group of healthy participants were submitted to an implicit and an explicit self-voice recognition task. They listened to pairs of pre-recorded auditory stimuli (words or pseudowords) pronounced by themselves, by a familiar or an unfamiliar person. Afterwards, in the “Implicit task” participants had to judge whether the pair of stimuli were pronounced by same or different speakers; in the “Explicit task” they had to identify if one of the stimuli was or not their own voice. Results showed a difference between Implicit and Explicit tasks since participants were more accurate in implicit than explicit self voice-recognition. Moreover, in the Implicit task, participants had the same level of accuracy when they had to judge stimuli pronounced with self or others’ voice, whereas when an explicit voice-recognition was required, they were less accurate with self than with others’ voice.
2014
Who is speaking? Implicit and explicit self and other voice recognition / Michela Candini;Elisa Zamagni;Angela Nuzzo;Francesco Ruotolo;Tina Iachini;Francesca Frassinetti. - In: BRAIN AND COGNITION. - ISSN 0278-2626. - ELETTRONICO. - 92:(2014), pp. 112-117. [10.1016/j.bandc.2014.10.001]
Michela Candini;Elisa Zamagni;Angela Nuzzo;Francesco Ruotolo;Tina Iachini;Francesca Frassinetti
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/395833
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