A field study conducted to investigate the flow and turbulence structure of the urban boundary layer (UBL) over an industrial/suburban area is described. The emphasis was on morning and evening transition periods, but some measurements covered the entire diurnal cycle. The data analysis incorporated the dependence of wind direction on morphometric parameters of the urban canopy. The measurements of heat and momentum fluxes showed the possibility of a constant flux layer above the height z ≈ 2H, wherein the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) is valid; here H is the averaged building height. For the nocturnal boundary layer, the mean velocity and temperature profiles obeyed classical MOST scaling up to ∼ 0. 5Λ(∼ 6H), where Λ is the Obukhov length scale, beyond which stronger stratification may disrupt the occurrence of constant fluxes. For unstable and neutral cases, MOST scaling described the mean data well up to the maximum measured height ∼ 6H. Available MOST functions, however, could not describe the measured turbulence structure, indicating the influence of additional governing parameters. Alternative turbulence parameterizations were tested, and some were found to perform well. Calculation of integral length scales for convective and neutral cases allowed a phenomenological description of eddy characteristics within and above the urban canopy layer. The development of a significant nocturnal surface inversion occurred only on certain days, for which a criterion was proposed. The nocturnal UBL exhibited length scale relationships consistent with the evening collapse of the convective boundary layer and maintenance of buoyancy-affected turbulence overnight. The length and velocity scales so identified are useful in parameterizing turbulent dispersion coefficients in different diurnal phases of the UBL.

Flow and turbulence in an industrial/suburban roughness canopy / Ann Dallman; S. Di Sabatino; H. J. S. Fernando. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS. - ISSN 1567-7419. - STAMPA. - 13:(2013), pp. 279-307. [10.1007/s10652-013-9274-7]

Flow and turbulence in an industrial/suburban roughness canopy

DI SABATINO, SILVANA;
2013

Abstract

A field study conducted to investigate the flow and turbulence structure of the urban boundary layer (UBL) over an industrial/suburban area is described. The emphasis was on morning and evening transition periods, but some measurements covered the entire diurnal cycle. The data analysis incorporated the dependence of wind direction on morphometric parameters of the urban canopy. The measurements of heat and momentum fluxes showed the possibility of a constant flux layer above the height z ≈ 2H, wherein the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) is valid; here H is the averaged building height. For the nocturnal boundary layer, the mean velocity and temperature profiles obeyed classical MOST scaling up to ∼ 0. 5Λ(∼ 6H), where Λ is the Obukhov length scale, beyond which stronger stratification may disrupt the occurrence of constant fluxes. For unstable and neutral cases, MOST scaling described the mean data well up to the maximum measured height ∼ 6H. Available MOST functions, however, could not describe the measured turbulence structure, indicating the influence of additional governing parameters. Alternative turbulence parameterizations were tested, and some were found to perform well. Calculation of integral length scales for convective and neutral cases allowed a phenomenological description of eddy characteristics within and above the urban canopy layer. The development of a significant nocturnal surface inversion occurred only on certain days, for which a criterion was proposed. The nocturnal UBL exhibited length scale relationships consistent with the evening collapse of the convective boundary layer and maintenance of buoyancy-affected turbulence overnight. The length and velocity scales so identified are useful in parameterizing turbulent dispersion coefficients in different diurnal phases of the UBL.
2013
Flow and turbulence in an industrial/suburban roughness canopy / Ann Dallman; S. Di Sabatino; H. J. S. Fernando. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS. - ISSN 1567-7419. - STAMPA. - 13:(2013), pp. 279-307. [10.1007/s10652-013-9274-7]
Ann Dallman; S. Di Sabatino; H. J. S. Fernando
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/394669
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