Porous poly(-caprolactone) (PCL) is used as long-term bioresorbable scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The bone regeneration process can be enhanced by addition of carbonated apatites (AP). This study was aimed at evaluating the influence of the PCL/AP ratio on the in vitro degradation and bioactivity of PCL-AP composites. To this purpose, PCL-AP samples were synthesised with the following PCL/AP weight/weight ratios: 50/50, 60/40 and 75/25. Vibrational IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled to thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to investigate the in vitro degradation mechanism in different media: 0.01 M NaOH solution (pH=12), saline phosphate buffer at pH 7.5 (SPB), esterase in SPB and simulated body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.5. The latter medium was used to evaluate the bioactivity of the composites. A control PCL sample was analysed before the addition of the AP component. As regards the untreated samples, the method of synthesis utilised for preparing the composite was found to enhance the crystallinity degree. The AP component revealed to be constituted of a B-type carbonated hydroxyapatite with a 3% carbonate content. After 28 days of treatment, the samples showed different degradation patterns and extents depending on the degradation medium, the starting PCL crystallinity and composite composition. Weight measurements, Raman and TG analyses revealed deposition of an apatitic phase on all the composites immersed in SBF. Therefore, all the samples displayed a good bioactivity; the sample which showed the most pronounced apatitic deposition was 50/50, i.e. that containing the highest amount of AP.

In vitro bioactivity of poly(e-caprolactone)-apatite(PCL-AP) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: the influence of the PCL/AP ratio.

TADDEI, PAOLA;DI FOGGIA, MICHELE;FAGNANO, CONCEZIO
2006

Abstract

Porous poly(-caprolactone) (PCL) is used as long-term bioresorbable scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The bone regeneration process can be enhanced by addition of carbonated apatites (AP). This study was aimed at evaluating the influence of the PCL/AP ratio on the in vitro degradation and bioactivity of PCL-AP composites. To this purpose, PCL-AP samples were synthesised with the following PCL/AP weight/weight ratios: 50/50, 60/40 and 75/25. Vibrational IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled to thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to investigate the in vitro degradation mechanism in different media: 0.01 M NaOH solution (pH=12), saline phosphate buffer at pH 7.5 (SPB), esterase in SPB and simulated body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.5. The latter medium was used to evaluate the bioactivity of the composites. A control PCL sample was analysed before the addition of the AP component. As regards the untreated samples, the method of synthesis utilised for preparing the composite was found to enhance the crystallinity degree. The AP component revealed to be constituted of a B-type carbonated hydroxyapatite with a 3% carbonate content. After 28 days of treatment, the samples showed different degradation patterns and extents depending on the degradation medium, the starting PCL crystallinity and composite composition. Weight measurements, Raman and TG analyses revealed deposition of an apatitic phase on all the composites immersed in SBF. Therefore, all the samples displayed a good bioactivity; the sample which showed the most pronounced apatitic deposition was 50/50, i.e. that containing the highest amount of AP.
P. Taddei; M. Di Foggia; F. Causa; L. Ambrosio; C. Fagnano
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/39375
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