The paper argues that the individual filtering of information may be significantly different from one individual (or social group) to another, so that the likelihood of social congruence may be enhanced by individuals' ability to spot features of partial similarity across a variety of contexts. The paper informally identifies a social context as the set of conditions under which any specific co-ordination pattern (or set of co-ordination patterns) is feasible . A remarkable consequence of the shift of emphasis to co-ordination contexts is that, in a social universe characterized by a sufficient degree of internal differentiation, limited rationality makes congruence more likely (see below). A necessary condition for that is that individuals should be skilled social actors, so as to be able to identify similar attributes across a large number of individual (or social) types. This suggests that social equilibrium may be the unintended outcome of multiple cases of 'niche co-ordination'. In this case, however, the different niches should belong to a social continuum in which individuals (or groups) share certain features with adjacent individuals (or groups) though by no means with all agents in the same social set. Social congruence may be differently construed depending upon the rationality framework in which interaction takes place. A cognitive setting characterised by the ability to detect unusual connections in a diverse social universe is one in which rationality is practical rather than 'universal'. In this case, multiple foci breed distinct perspectives from which co-ordination may be sought. The paper maintains that limited rationality suggests inferential diversity. The latter expresses itself by means of manifold attitudes to similarity and conceptual association. Indirect social knowledge may be derived from direct experiences as a result of lateral exploration (exploration within a continuum of partial similarities). And this process normally follows a different route depending upon the specific context in which each individual elaborates her (his) own cognitive endowment. This approach makes congruence an unintended outcome of social diversity, provided the latter follows the pattern of partial similarity and limited (local) difference described above.

Coordination, Context and Patterns of Reasoning

SCAZZIERI, ROBERTO
2004

Abstract

The paper argues that the individual filtering of information may be significantly different from one individual (or social group) to another, so that the likelihood of social congruence may be enhanced by individuals' ability to spot features of partial similarity across a variety of contexts. The paper informally identifies a social context as the set of conditions under which any specific co-ordination pattern (or set of co-ordination patterns) is feasible . A remarkable consequence of the shift of emphasis to co-ordination contexts is that, in a social universe characterized by a sufficient degree of internal differentiation, limited rationality makes congruence more likely (see below). A necessary condition for that is that individuals should be skilled social actors, so as to be able to identify similar attributes across a large number of individual (or social) types. This suggests that social equilibrium may be the unintended outcome of multiple cases of 'niche co-ordination'. In this case, however, the different niches should belong to a social continuum in which individuals (or groups) share certain features with adjacent individuals (or groups) though by no means with all agents in the same social set. Social congruence may be differently construed depending upon the rationality framework in which interaction takes place. A cognitive setting characterised by the ability to detect unusual connections in a diverse social universe is one in which rationality is practical rather than 'universal'. In this case, multiple foci breed distinct perspectives from which co-ordination may be sought. The paper maintains that limited rationality suggests inferential diversity. The latter expresses itself by means of manifold attitudes to similarity and conceptual association. Indirect social knowledge may be derived from direct experiences as a result of lateral exploration (exploration within a continuum of partial similarities). And this process normally follows a different route depending upon the specific context in which each individual elaborates her (his) own cognitive endowment. This approach makes congruence an unintended outcome of social diversity, provided the latter follows the pattern of partial similarity and limited (local) difference described above.
2004
Rationality and Patterns of Reasoning. A European Perspective
1
19
Scazzieri R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/31052
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