Ninety-six laying hens were allocated to 4 groups and fed diets (control diet (0-0), diet supplemented with 2.5 ppm aflatoxin B1 (0-AF); diet supplemented with 0.11% mannanoligosaccharide (MOS-0); diet supplemented with 0.11% MOS and 2.5 ppm aflatoxin B1 (MOS-AF) for 4 wk to evaluate the effect of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), mannanoligosaccharide (MOS), or both on egg quality and the in vivo efficacy of MOS to interact with an oral administration of AFB1. After 2 and 3 wk, egg weight decreased (P < 0.05) in the group fed MOS-0 versus groups on 0-0 and 0-AF. Egg shell weight was lower (P < 0.05) in the group fed 0-AF. Aflatoxin influenced color (Key words: laying hen, aflatoxin B1, mannanoligosaccharide, egg, residue) parameters, which were probably related to interference of AFB1 with lipid metabolism and pigmentary substances deposition in yolk. MOS appeared to increase protein percentage in albumen. No AFB1 or aflatoxin M1 (AFM1; a polar metabolite of AFB1) residues were found in eggs of the experimental groups. Livers from groups 0-0 and MOS-0 always tested negative for AFB1 and AFM1. Differences (P < 0.01) were found between AFB1 hepatic levels of group 0-AF (mean ± SD: 4.13 ± 1.95 ppb) and group MOS-AF (mean ± SD: 2.21 ± 1.37 ppb). The data demonstrated the ability ofMOS to adsorb and degrade AFB1, reducing gastrointestinal absorption of AFB1 and its levels in tissues.

Mannanoligosaccharides and Aflatoxin B1 in feed for laying hens: effects on egg quality, Aflatoxin B1 and M1 residues in eggs, and Aflatoxin B1 levels in liver

ZAGHINI, ANNA;MARTELLI, GIOVANNA;RONCADA, PAOLA;SIMIOLI, MARCO;RIZZI, LAURA
2005

Abstract

Ninety-six laying hens were allocated to 4 groups and fed diets (control diet (0-0), diet supplemented with 2.5 ppm aflatoxin B1 (0-AF); diet supplemented with 0.11% mannanoligosaccharide (MOS-0); diet supplemented with 0.11% MOS and 2.5 ppm aflatoxin B1 (MOS-AF) for 4 wk to evaluate the effect of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), mannanoligosaccharide (MOS), or both on egg quality and the in vivo efficacy of MOS to interact with an oral administration of AFB1. After 2 and 3 wk, egg weight decreased (P < 0.05) in the group fed MOS-0 versus groups on 0-0 and 0-AF. Egg shell weight was lower (P < 0.05) in the group fed 0-AF. Aflatoxin influenced color (Key words: laying hen, aflatoxin B1, mannanoligosaccharide, egg, residue) parameters, which were probably related to interference of AFB1 with lipid metabolism and pigmentary substances deposition in yolk. MOS appeared to increase protein percentage in albumen. No AFB1 or aflatoxin M1 (AFM1; a polar metabolite of AFB1) residues were found in eggs of the experimental groups. Livers from groups 0-0 and MOS-0 always tested negative for AFB1 and AFM1. Differences (P < 0.01) were found between AFB1 hepatic levels of group 0-AF (mean ± SD: 4.13 ± 1.95 ppb) and group MOS-AF (mean ± SD: 2.21 ± 1.37 ppb). The data demonstrated the ability ofMOS to adsorb and degrade AFB1, reducing gastrointestinal absorption of AFB1 and its levels in tissues.
POULTRY SCIENCE
ZAGHINI A.; MARTELLI G.; RONCADA P.; SIMIOLI M.; RIZZI L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/2443
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