The translation into major languages of literature written in minor languages is far less common than the translation into minor languages of literature written in major languages. The author argues that the translator has a prominent role in the dissemination of literature in lesser-known languages and cultures. The author discusses the concepts of domesticating and foreignising and describes an example in which translators play a role that goes beyond that of linguistic mediator and includes introducing to a Western readership a language and a culture that was previously little known among Western readers. The language in question is Tamil, a language spoken in the state of Madras, in southern India. The author shortly analyses the English version of the Tamil novel Suzhalil Mithakkum Deepangal (1987) [Lamps in the Whirlpool, 1995]. This translation is part of a larger project involving a series of translations of Indian novels into English, supported by the subsidiary in India of the prestigious international publishing Macmillan. In her analysis, the author shows the effort of editors and translators to bring the Western reader close to the Indian source culture, trying to locate in one language – English – a reality that occurs in another – Tamil –, by using long introductions and countless footnotes. Even so, it seems to her that they have only touched upon the original meaning.

Herrero, Leticia. (2005). "Regional Indian literature in English - Translation or recreation?". In Branchadell, Albert and Lovell Margaret West (eds.) Less Translated Languages, Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 225-235.

NADIANI, GIOVANNI
2005

Abstract

The translation into major languages of literature written in minor languages is far less common than the translation into minor languages of literature written in major languages. The author argues that the translator has a prominent role in the dissemination of literature in lesser-known languages and cultures. The author discusses the concepts of domesticating and foreignising and describes an example in which translators play a role that goes beyond that of linguistic mediator and includes introducing to a Western readership a language and a culture that was previously little known among Western readers. The language in question is Tamil, a language spoken in the state of Madras, in southern India. The author shortly analyses the English version of the Tamil novel Suzhalil Mithakkum Deepangal (1987) [Lamps in the Whirlpool, 1995]. This translation is part of a larger project involving a series of translations of Indian novels into English, supported by the subsidiary in India of the prestigious international publishing Macmillan. In her analysis, the author shows the effort of editors and translators to bring the Western reader close to the Indian source culture, trying to locate in one language – English – a reality that occurs in another – Tamil –, by using long introductions and countless footnotes. Even so, it seems to her that they have only touched upon the original meaning.
2005
NADIANI G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/20846
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