Aquaculture is a zootechnical sector in increasing expansion over the world which could be strategic for the economic and social advancement of developing countries, including the African continent. The European BOMOSA Project (Integrating BOMOSA cage fish farming systems in reservoirs, ponds and temporary water bodies in Eastern Africa) (2006-2009) intended to establish small scale fish farming in marginal water bodies in East African countries creating rural aquaculture networks with the aim to economically integrate aquaculture with agriculture. In the framework of the BOMOSA project, a study of veterinary and public health aspects in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) cultured in Bomosa fish farming systems has been carried out. The activities of the DVM thesis here summarized fall in this field and have been performed from October to December 2007 in Sagana Fish Farm, the main BOMOSA Kenyan hub. In this period a total of 160 tilapias have been sampled from 11 farm ponds and subjected to complete parasitological examination. In some cases, infected tissues were fixed in 10% buffered formalin for histology. Furthermore, in order to study the life cycle of some helminths recovered in the farmed fish, parasitological analyses were carried out on 72 gastropods owing to Bulinus and Melanoides genera, and 5 piscivorous birds (2 herons Ardea cinerea, 2 hammerkop Scopus umbretta and 1 cormoran Phalacrocorax carbo). This survey allowed to identify several protozoan, myxozoan and metazoan parasites which could be pathogenic to farmed fish and, in some case, to humans. The results of parasitological exams carried out on gastropods and piscivorous birds confirmed the presence of all the suitable hosts for a successful completion of the life cycle of several helminths recovered from farmed fish.

Aspetti veterinari e di sanità pubblica nell’allevamento della tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Kenia.

GUSTINELLI, ANDREA;FLORIO, DANIELA;FIORAVANTI, MARIALETIZIA
2010

Abstract

Aquaculture is a zootechnical sector in increasing expansion over the world which could be strategic for the economic and social advancement of developing countries, including the African continent. The European BOMOSA Project (Integrating BOMOSA cage fish farming systems in reservoirs, ponds and temporary water bodies in Eastern Africa) (2006-2009) intended to establish small scale fish farming in marginal water bodies in East African countries creating rural aquaculture networks with the aim to economically integrate aquaculture with agriculture. In the framework of the BOMOSA project, a study of veterinary and public health aspects in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) cultured in Bomosa fish farming systems has been carried out. The activities of the DVM thesis here summarized fall in this field and have been performed from October to December 2007 in Sagana Fish Farm, the main BOMOSA Kenyan hub. In this period a total of 160 tilapias have been sampled from 11 farm ponds and subjected to complete parasitological examination. In some cases, infected tissues were fixed in 10% buffered formalin for histology. Furthermore, in order to study the life cycle of some helminths recovered in the farmed fish, parasitological analyses were carried out on 72 gastropods owing to Bulinus and Melanoides genera, and 5 piscivorous birds (2 herons Ardea cinerea, 2 hammerkop Scopus umbretta and 1 cormoran Phalacrocorax carbo). This survey allowed to identify several protozoan, myxozoan and metazoan parasites which could be pathogenic to farmed fish and, in some case, to humans. The results of parasitological exams carried out on gastropods and piscivorous birds confirmed the presence of all the suitable hosts for a successful completion of the life cycle of several helminths recovered from farmed fish.
Turci F.; Gustinelli A.; Florio D.; Fioravanti M.L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/155839
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