This study examined the spatiotemporal immune response in listeric rhombencephalitis of ruminants in situ. Our data support the view that astrocytes facilitate the containment of infectious lesions. Results on the natural disease recapitulate observations in experimental rodent models and suggest that the mounted adaptive lymphocytic response of ruminants is effective in eliminating Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, our data indicate earlier participation of the adaptive immune response, a stronger B lymphocyte contribution and a more protracted macrophage infiltration in the natural disease than it has been deduced from experimental models. Therefore, such models should be complemented by studies in natural host systems. Various macrophage and microglia subsets are involved in listeric rhombencephalitis and their differential contribution may account for species differences in clinical course and outcome of infection as might species differences in the B-cell response. Future functional ex vivo and in vitro studies are necessary to further investigate the findings obtained in the present study.

Comparative spatiotemporal analysis of the intrathecal immune response in natural listeric rhombencephalitis of cattle and small ruminants

Di Palma S;BRUNETTI, BARBARA;
2012

Abstract

This study examined the spatiotemporal immune response in listeric rhombencephalitis of ruminants in situ. Our data support the view that astrocytes facilitate the containment of infectious lesions. Results on the natural disease recapitulate observations in experimental rodent models and suggest that the mounted adaptive lymphocytic response of ruminants is effective in eliminating Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, our data indicate earlier participation of the adaptive immune response, a stronger B lymphocyte contribution and a more protracted macrophage infiltration in the natural disease than it has been deduced from experimental models. Therefore, such models should be complemented by studies in natural host systems. Various macrophage and microglia subsets are involved in listeric rhombencephalitis and their differential contribution may account for species differences in clinical course and outcome of infection as might species differences in the B-cell response. Future functional ex vivo and in vitro studies are necessary to further investigate the findings obtained in the present study.
Di Palma S; Brunetti B; Doherr MG; Forster U; Hilbe M; Zurbriggen A; Vandevelde M; Oevermann A
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/118958
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 8
  • Scopus 16
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
social impact