STUDY OBJECTIVE: To discuss our clinical and surgical experience with 30 cases of ureteral endometriosis. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). SETTING: Tertiary care university hospital. PATIENTS: Records were assessed for all patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) from June 2002 through June 2006. Thirty patients were laparoscopically given a diagnosis that was histologically confirmed of ureteral involvement by endometriosis. INTERVENTIONS: Laparoscopic retroperitoneal examination and management of ureteral endometriosis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Variables assessed were: preoperative findings (patient characteristics, clinical symptoms, preoperative workup), operative details (type and site of ureteral involvement, associated endometriotic lesions, type of intervention, intraoperative complications), and postoperative follow-up (short- and long-term outcomes). We recorded details of 30 patients with a median age of 33.33 years and a median body mass index of 21.96. Symptoms reported were: none in 20 (66.7%) of 30 patients, specific in 10 (33.3%) of 30, dysuria (30%), renal angle pain (10%), hematuria (3.3%), and hydroureteronephrosis (33.3%). Ureteral endometriosis was presumptively diagnosed before surgery in 40% of patients. Ureteric involvement was on the left side in 46.7%, on the right side in 26.7%, and bilaterally in 26.7%. It was extrinsic in 86.7% and intrinsic in 13.3%. It was associated with endometriosis of homolateral uterosacral ligament in all (100%) of 30, the bladder in 50%, rectovaginal septum in 80%, ovaries in 53.3%, and bowel in 36.7%. Laparoscopic intervention was: only ureterolysis in 73.3%, segmental ureteral resection and terminoterminal anastomosis in 16.7%, and segmental ureterectomy and ureterocystoneostomy in 10%. Early postoperative complications were: fever greater than 38 degrees C requiring medical therapy for 7 days in 7 patients and 1 patient had transient urinary retention requiring catheterization that resolved without further treatment. During a mean follow-up period of 14.6 months, endometriosis recurred in 3 patients with no evidence of ureteral reinvolvement. CONCLUSION: Ureteral involvement is a silent, serious complication that must be suspected in all cases of DIE. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic isolation and inspection of both ureters helps to diagnose silent ureteral involvement. Conservative laparoscopic surgery provides a safe, feasible modality for management of ureteral endometriosis.

Importance of retroperitoneal ureteric evaluation in cases of deep infiltrating endometriosis.

SERACCHIOLI, RENATO;MANUZZI, LINDA;GUERRINI, MANUELA;VILLA, GIOIA;MONTANARI, GIULIA;FABBRI, ELENA;VENTUROLI, STEFANO
2008

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To discuss our clinical and surgical experience with 30 cases of ureteral endometriosis. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). SETTING: Tertiary care university hospital. PATIENTS: Records were assessed for all patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) from June 2002 through June 2006. Thirty patients were laparoscopically given a diagnosis that was histologically confirmed of ureteral involvement by endometriosis. INTERVENTIONS: Laparoscopic retroperitoneal examination and management of ureteral endometriosis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Variables assessed were: preoperative findings (patient characteristics, clinical symptoms, preoperative workup), operative details (type and site of ureteral involvement, associated endometriotic lesions, type of intervention, intraoperative complications), and postoperative follow-up (short- and long-term outcomes). We recorded details of 30 patients with a median age of 33.33 years and a median body mass index of 21.96. Symptoms reported were: none in 20 (66.7%) of 30 patients, specific in 10 (33.3%) of 30, dysuria (30%), renal angle pain (10%), hematuria (3.3%), and hydroureteronephrosis (33.3%). Ureteral endometriosis was presumptively diagnosed before surgery in 40% of patients. Ureteric involvement was on the left side in 46.7%, on the right side in 26.7%, and bilaterally in 26.7%. It was extrinsic in 86.7% and intrinsic in 13.3%. It was associated with endometriosis of homolateral uterosacral ligament in all (100%) of 30, the bladder in 50%, rectovaginal septum in 80%, ovaries in 53.3%, and bowel in 36.7%. Laparoscopic intervention was: only ureterolysis in 73.3%, segmental ureteral resection and terminoterminal anastomosis in 16.7%, and segmental ureterectomy and ureterocystoneostomy in 10%. Early postoperative complications were: fever greater than 38 degrees C requiring medical therapy for 7 days in 7 patients and 1 patient had transient urinary retention requiring catheterization that resolved without further treatment. During a mean follow-up period of 14.6 months, endometriosis recurred in 3 patients with no evidence of ureteral reinvolvement. CONCLUSION: Ureteral involvement is a silent, serious complication that must be suspected in all cases of DIE. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic isolation and inspection of both ureters helps to diagnose silent ureteral involvement. Conservative laparoscopic surgery provides a safe, feasible modality for management of ureteral endometriosis.
2008
Seracchioli R.; Mabrouk M.; Manuzzi L.; Guerrini M.; Villa G.; Montanari G.; Fabbri E.; Venturoli S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/116392
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