The scaling of the ultimate load in fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP)–concrete debonding with the relative width of the FRP is experimentally investigated in this paper. Shear debonding tests are performed to evaluate the cohesive stress transfer between the adherents during the interface crack growth which produces debonding. Concrete specimens with two different widths and different widths of FRP are used in the experimental programme. The nominal stress at debonding increases with the FRP-to-concrete width ratio. For a given width of FRP composite sheet, lower debonding stress is obtained from concrete specimens with a larger width. The strain distribution on the FRP and concrete free surface at different stages of debonding was determined using a full-field optical technique known as digital image correlation. The contribution of the two factors, the boundary effect and the restraint from the surrounding concrete, was studied from the measured strain distribution. The strain distributions across the FRP composite sheet and the concrete within the cohesive stress transfer zone associated with the interface crack are shown to be very inhomogeneous. A region of constant width associated with high shear strains is found at the edge of the FRP sheet during the entire debonding process. The increase in the ultimate nominal stress at debonding is shown to be due to the decrease in the proportion of the total width of the FRP occupied by the edge region. It is shown that the boundary region within the FRP is of a fixed width. The width of concrete close to the edge of the FRP involved in stress transfer, however, increases with the width of FRP. It is established that when the FRP-to-concrete width ratio is smaller than 0.5, the level of restraint from concrete increases with the FRP width.

An Understanding of the Width Effect in FRP–Concrete Debonding

CARLONI, CHRISTIAN;NOBILE, LUCIO
2011

Abstract

The scaling of the ultimate load in fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP)–concrete debonding with the relative width of the FRP is experimentally investigated in this paper. Shear debonding tests are performed to evaluate the cohesive stress transfer between the adherents during the interface crack growth which produces debonding. Concrete specimens with two different widths and different widths of FRP are used in the experimental programme. The nominal stress at debonding increases with the FRP-to-concrete width ratio. For a given width of FRP composite sheet, lower debonding stress is obtained from concrete specimens with a larger width. The strain distribution on the FRP and concrete free surface at different stages of debonding was determined using a full-field optical technique known as digital image correlation. The contribution of the two factors, the boundary effect and the restraint from the surrounding concrete, was studied from the measured strain distribution. The strain distributions across the FRP composite sheet and the concrete within the cohesive stress transfer zone associated with the interface crack are shown to be very inhomogeneous. A region of constant width associated with high shear strains is found at the edge of the FRP sheet during the entire debonding process. The increase in the ultimate nominal stress at debonding is shown to be due to the decrease in the proportion of the total width of the FRP occupied by the edge region. It is shown that the boundary region within the FRP is of a fixed width. The width of concrete close to the edge of the FRP involved in stress transfer, however, increases with the width of FRP. It is established that when the FRP-to-concrete width ratio is smaller than 0.5, the level of restraint from concrete increases with the FRP width.
K. V. Subramaniam; C. Carloni; L. Nobile
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/116099
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