Based on the information provided by the petitioners, and assuming for adults in Europe a mean dietary selenium intake in the range of 24-89 µg/day and a high anticipated dietary exposure of 108 µg selenium/day, the Panel estimated that consumption of a supplement containing 100 µg selenium (lowest proposed use level) in the form of L-selenomethionine by adults would provide a total anticipated exposure of between 124 and 189 µg selenium/day at the average level of dietary selenium intake and a total anticipated exposure of 208 µg selenium/day at the high percentile dietary selenium intake. These intakes will be below the UL of 300 µg/day for selenium in adults established by the SCF in 2000. Assuming a mean dietary selenium intake for children (aged between 2 and 17 years) in Europe in the range of 23-42 µg/day, and a high percentile intake range of 32-77 µg/day, the Panel estimated that daily consumption of an additional food supplement containing 100 µg selenium (lowest proposed use level) in the form of L-selenomethionine by children would provide a total anticipated exposure of between 123 and 142 µg selenium /day at the average level of dietary selenium intake and a total anticipated exposure of between 132 and 177 µg selenium /day at the high percentile dietary selenium intake. These intakes will exceed the ULs of 60, 90, and 130 µg selenium/day for children at the ages of 1-3, 4-6 and 7-10 years respectively. The ULs of 200 µg selenium/day for children aged between 11 and 14 years and 250 µg selenium/day for children aged between 15 and 17 years will not be exceeded. On the basis of the data provided by the petitioners and information in the literature on the bioavailability, metabolism and toxicity of L-selenomethionine, from dietary sources and in the form of dietary supplements, the Panel concludes that the use of L-selenomethionine as a source of selenium for nutritional purposes in food supplements would not be of safety concern in adults at use levels up to 250 μg/day (corresponding to up to 100 μg selenium/day). At this use level the combined intake from diet and supplement use will be below the SCF’s UL, even for individuals also having a high dietary intake of selenium (i.e. greater than 100 μg selenium/day from the diet). In relation to the use of supplements containing L-selenomethionine by children, when dietary intake of selenium by children is also taken into account, the ULs defined by the SCF for children are likely to be exceeded, except in the case of children aged between 11 and 17 years and consuming supplements containing 100 µg/day selenium (lowest proposed use level) or less. The Panel considers, however, that the current database on selenium compounds and the new data provided by the recent SELECT study indicate the need for an integrated reconsideration of the UL for selenium from all sources, and recommends that this also considers systemic selenium levels rather than external dose in characterising dose-response relationships, in order to allow a comparison of selenium-containing compounds with different bioavailabilities.

L-selenomethionine as a source of selenium added for nutritional purposes to food supplements

GRILLI, SANDRO;
2009

Abstract

Based on the information provided by the petitioners, and assuming for adults in Europe a mean dietary selenium intake in the range of 24-89 µg/day and a high anticipated dietary exposure of 108 µg selenium/day, the Panel estimated that consumption of a supplement containing 100 µg selenium (lowest proposed use level) in the form of L-selenomethionine by adults would provide a total anticipated exposure of between 124 and 189 µg selenium/day at the average level of dietary selenium intake and a total anticipated exposure of 208 µg selenium/day at the high percentile dietary selenium intake. These intakes will be below the UL of 300 µg/day for selenium in adults established by the SCF in 2000. Assuming a mean dietary selenium intake for children (aged between 2 and 17 years) in Europe in the range of 23-42 µg/day, and a high percentile intake range of 32-77 µg/day, the Panel estimated that daily consumption of an additional food supplement containing 100 µg selenium (lowest proposed use level) in the form of L-selenomethionine by children would provide a total anticipated exposure of between 123 and 142 µg selenium /day at the average level of dietary selenium intake and a total anticipated exposure of between 132 and 177 µg selenium /day at the high percentile dietary selenium intake. These intakes will exceed the ULs of 60, 90, and 130 µg selenium/day for children at the ages of 1-3, 4-6 and 7-10 years respectively. The ULs of 200 µg selenium/day for children aged between 11 and 14 years and 250 µg selenium/day for children aged between 15 and 17 years will not be exceeded. On the basis of the data provided by the petitioners and information in the literature on the bioavailability, metabolism and toxicity of L-selenomethionine, from dietary sources and in the form of dietary supplements, the Panel concludes that the use of L-selenomethionine as a source of selenium for nutritional purposes in food supplements would not be of safety concern in adults at use levels up to 250 μg/day (corresponding to up to 100 μg selenium/day). At this use level the combined intake from diet and supplement use will be below the SCF’s UL, even for individuals also having a high dietary intake of selenium (i.e. greater than 100 μg selenium/day from the diet). In relation to the use of supplements containing L-selenomethionine by children, when dietary intake of selenium by children is also taken into account, the ULs defined by the SCF for children are likely to be exceeded, except in the case of children aged between 11 and 17 years and consuming supplements containing 100 µg/day selenium (lowest proposed use level) or less. The Panel considers, however, that the current database on selenium compounds and the new data provided by the recent SELECT study indicate the need for an integrated reconsideration of the UL for selenium from all sources, and recommends that this also considers systemic selenium levels rather than external dose in characterising dose-response relationships, in order to allow a comparison of selenium-containing compounds with different bioavailabilities.
F. Aguilar; U.R. Charrondiere; B. Dusemund; P. Galtier; J. Gilbert; D.M. Gott; S. Grilli; R. Guertler; G.E.N. Kass; J. Koenig; C. Lambré; J-C. Larsen; J-C. Leblanc; A. Mortensen; D. Parent-Massin; I. Pratt; I.M.C.M. Rietjens; I. Stankovic; P. Tobback; T. Verguieva; R. Woutersen.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/101813
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact