Miniaturization has been an essential ingredient in the outstanding progress of information technology over the past fifty years. The next, perhaps ultimate, limit of miniaturization is that of molecules, which are the smallest entities with definite size, shape, and properties. Molecular-level systems that respond to external stimulation by changing some physical or chemical properties can be viewed as input-output devices and therefore may be useful for transferring, processing, and storing information. Some of these nanoscale devices can, in fact, perform logic operations of remarkable complexity. This research – although far from being transferred into technology – is attracting interest, as the nanometer realm seems to be out of reach for the ‘top-down’ techniques currently available to microelectronics industry. Leaving aside futuristic speculations related to the construction of a chemical computer, molecular logic devices could be interesting for specific applications in areas such as diagnostics, medicine and materials science, where problems need to be addressed in places – e.g. inside a cell – that are out of reach for a silicon-based computer. Here we discuss the idea of processing information with artificial multicomponent molecular systems in solution by illustrating a few recent examples developed in our laboratory.

Processing Chemical and Photonic Signals by Artificial Multicomponent Molecular Systems

BARONCINI, MASSIMO;SEMERARO, MONICA;CREDI, ALBERTO
2011

Abstract

Miniaturization has been an essential ingredient in the outstanding progress of information technology over the past fifty years. The next, perhaps ultimate, limit of miniaturization is that of molecules, which are the smallest entities with definite size, shape, and properties. Molecular-level systems that respond to external stimulation by changing some physical or chemical properties can be viewed as input-output devices and therefore may be useful for transferring, processing, and storing information. Some of these nanoscale devices can, in fact, perform logic operations of remarkable complexity. This research – although far from being transferred into technology – is attracting interest, as the nanometer realm seems to be out of reach for the ‘top-down’ techniques currently available to microelectronics industry. Leaving aside futuristic speculations related to the construction of a chemical computer, molecular logic devices could be interesting for specific applications in areas such as diagnostics, medicine and materials science, where problems need to be addressed in places – e.g. inside a cell – that are out of reach for a silicon-based computer. Here we discuss the idea of processing information with artificial multicomponent molecular systems in solution by illustrating a few recent examples developed in our laboratory.
M. Baroncini; M. Semeraro; A. Credi
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/100364
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 10
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
social impact