The stolbur disease was described in Hungary more that fifty years ago on potato, pepper, tomato, tobacco and thorn apple (Datura stramonium). In the years of the ’50s, ’70s as well as in 2003-2005 stolbur disease caused mainly outbreaks in potatoes. The first molecular identification of stolbur phytoplasma was done by Viczian et al., (Növényvédelem, 34, 11. 1998) on the following species: pepper, tomato, parsley, rape, bladder campion (Silene vulgaris), and thorn apple. Later further plants and insect species joint to the list as carrot, celery, bindweed, nettle, common dandelion as well as grapevine, and Reptalus panzeri, indicating the wide spread presence of this phytoplasma in Hungary on crops and on wild plants as well. Molecular characterization of Hungarian stolbur strains has high importance to study epidemiology and to devise management of the disease in the field. In this study the Tuf-type characterization of different Hungarian strains from grapevine, potato and tomato was performed. Stolbur positive samples identified on 16S ribosomal gene R16F2/R2 amplicons followed by TruI restriction digestion were amplified with fTuf1/rTuf1 and fTufAy/rTufAy primers in nested PCR, and digested with HpaII restriction enzyme (Langer and Maixner, Vitis, 43, 191-199. 2004) to identify the tuf-type. RFLP profiles obtained for the three species were referable to the stolbur tuf-type b. These results suggest possibility that stolbur phytoplasmas associated with major diseases of grapevine and potatoes are maintained in Convolvulus arvensis as wild host plant considering that this species is widespread in Hungary. This hypothesis is also supported by the high density of bindweed in all cultivated areas of Hungary. Further characterization of stolbur strains from the same species as well as from other species and insect vector or potential vector of stolbur phytoplasmas is in progress. This study was (partly) supported by the ‘National Office for Research and Development’ as well as financed by the ‘Research and Technology Innovation Fund in Hungary’.

Tuf-type characterization of Hungarian stolbur strains from different host species

CONTALDO, NICOLETTA;BERTACCINI, ASSUNTA;
2010

Abstract

The stolbur disease was described in Hungary more that fifty years ago on potato, pepper, tomato, tobacco and thorn apple (Datura stramonium). In the years of the ’50s, ’70s as well as in 2003-2005 stolbur disease caused mainly outbreaks in potatoes. The first molecular identification of stolbur phytoplasma was done by Viczian et al., (Növényvédelem, 34, 11. 1998) on the following species: pepper, tomato, parsley, rape, bladder campion (Silene vulgaris), and thorn apple. Later further plants and insect species joint to the list as carrot, celery, bindweed, nettle, common dandelion as well as grapevine, and Reptalus panzeri, indicating the wide spread presence of this phytoplasma in Hungary on crops and on wild plants as well. Molecular characterization of Hungarian stolbur strains has high importance to study epidemiology and to devise management of the disease in the field. In this study the Tuf-type characterization of different Hungarian strains from grapevine, potato and tomato was performed. Stolbur positive samples identified on 16S ribosomal gene R16F2/R2 amplicons followed by TruI restriction digestion were amplified with fTuf1/rTuf1 and fTufAy/rTufAy primers in nested PCR, and digested with HpaII restriction enzyme (Langer and Maixner, Vitis, 43, 191-199. 2004) to identify the tuf-type. RFLP profiles obtained for the three species were referable to the stolbur tuf-type b. These results suggest possibility that stolbur phytoplasmas associated with major diseases of grapevine and potatoes are maintained in Convolvulus arvensis as wild host plant considering that this species is widespread in Hungary. This hypothesis is also supported by the high density of bindweed in all cultivated areas of Hungary. Further characterization of stolbur strains from the same species as well as from other species and insect vector or potential vector of stolbur phytoplasmas is in progress. This study was (partly) supported by the ‘National Office for Research and Development’ as well as financed by the ‘Research and Technology Innovation Fund in Hungary’.
Current status and perspectives of phytoplasma disease research andmanagement
2
2
Acs Z.; I. Ember; N. Contaldo; Z. Nagy; A. Bertaccini; M. Kölber
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/93733
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact