There has been plenty of evidence that cognitive interventions hold potential for improving late-life cognition in healthy subjects, prompting successful aging. In recent years, interventions based on computerized cognitive training have been receiving particular attention, as they are considered to have several advantages over the traditional methods. However, it is still unclear what characteristics distinguish the most effective training regimens and whether the benefits deriving from the laboratory practice of certain cognitive skills can be translated into the improved day-to-day functioning of older adults. The present study aimed at investigating the efficacy of a single-domain attentional training in comparison with a multi-domain exergame training procedure. Seventy-six healthy older adults took part in the study. They were assigned to one of the three following conditions: single-domain attentional training, multi-domain exergame training, or no-contact passive control condition. All participants were assessed individually at the baseline and after the intervention phase (or a corresponding time period) with a battery of cognitive tests. Individuals assigned to the intervention groups underwent 8 laboratory-based sessions - lasting approximately 45 minutes each – of the respective training activity. The results indicate that, even though benefits can be observed following both of the training procedures, the positive effects of the single-domain attentional training appear to be superior to those induced by the multi-domain exergame practice. Participants assigned to the attentional computerized training demonstrated both domain-specific and far transfer effects, showing promise for the effectiveness of interventions targeting attention in enhancing older adults’ cognition.

Comparison of the effects of attentional computerized training program and multi-domain exergame training on cognitive functioning of healthy older adults

Mauro Gaspari;
2021

Abstract

There has been plenty of evidence that cognitive interventions hold potential for improving late-life cognition in healthy subjects, prompting successful aging. In recent years, interventions based on computerized cognitive training have been receiving particular attention, as they are considered to have several advantages over the traditional methods. However, it is still unclear what characteristics distinguish the most effective training regimens and whether the benefits deriving from the laboratory practice of certain cognitive skills can be translated into the improved day-to-day functioning of older adults. The present study aimed at investigating the efficacy of a single-domain attentional training in comparison with a multi-domain exergame training procedure. Seventy-six healthy older adults took part in the study. They were assigned to one of the three following conditions: single-domain attentional training, multi-domain exergame training, or no-contact passive control condition. All participants were assessed individually at the baseline and after the intervention phase (or a corresponding time period) with a battery of cognitive tests. Individuals assigned to the intervention groups underwent 8 laboratory-based sessions - lasting approximately 45 minutes each – of the respective training activity. The results indicate that, even though benefits can be observed following both of the training procedures, the positive effects of the single-domain attentional training appear to be superior to those induced by the multi-domain exergame practice. Participants assigned to the attentional computerized training demonstrated both domain-specific and far transfer effects, showing promise for the effectiveness of interventions targeting attention in enhancing older adults’ cognition.
Atti del XXVII CONGRESSO NAZIONALE Associazione Italiana di Psicologia Sezione Sperimentale
112
112
Agnieszka Barbara Kolasinska, Beatrice Moret, Massimo Nucci, Gianluca Campana, Floriano Zini, Mauro Gaspari, Franca Stablum
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/866528
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