Background. The research on the beneficial effects of music possesses a remarkable role in all areas of music education, health, and social care (Bunt 2012; Imberty 2005; MacDonald 2013). The efficacy of music for inclusion is affirmed by the World Health Organization (2001) and the participation to musical activities is considered a human right (Lubet 2011). However, the musical experience becomes inclusive if it is implemented in the framework of “inclusive school” (Canevaro et al. 2011). In this framework, the education of teachers and social workers is particularly relevant (Clough, et al. 2017): What skills must a teacher possess to satisfy human musicality in inclusive contexts and to promote well-being relationships? The university module Objectives: A Post Graduate Programme was developed at the University of Bologna, in the framework of the European Projects STALWARTS (Addessi 2019; Krüger et al. 2020), aimed at those who are interested in acquiring professional skills in music education and inclusion. The aims were to develop a professional profile based on the following competences: basic musical competences, technical-professional competences, and transversal competences. Methodology. Participatory action research: the participants (students, teachers, researchers) were involved in the planning of the contents and activities of the university programme, as well during the assessment procedure, by means interviews, workshops, meetings, questionnaires, focus groups. Participants: 28 students (musicians, teachers, professionals of education, music therapists, social workers); researchers and teachers of the STALWARTS project and the University. Contents: Workshops on musical creativity, improvisation and movement were implemented with the aim to develop basic and professional competences. Lectures on inclusive pedagogy, human musicality, neuroscience and music, flow, reflexive interaction, ethical framework, small-scale inquires were realised with the aim to develop professional and transversal competences. A tool kit was implemented, including observational grids and guide for small-scale inquiries. Data collected. The students were asked to draw their ideal of kindergarten and primary teacher during music classroom activities, before and after the university modules. Evaluation questionnaire of teaching activities was administered 
to the students. The learning outputs have been verified step by step through self and peer evaluation, and at the end by means small-scale inquiries realised by the participants in their working places. Results The analysis of the students’ drawings showed that their social representations about music education, inclusion and role of the teacher, changed during the implementation of the programme. Self and peer evaluations consolidate several reflective notes about music experience and inclusion. The students’ small-scale inquiries showed that they acquire both some basic research tools and abilities in the field of music education and inclusion. The students’ assessment of the module was positive. Conclusions The results of the university programme highlighted the importance of the university education of the operators and teachers who work in inclusive contexts. They show that the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and practical skills related to musical education in inclusive contexts is possible and that these competences allow teachers to plan and implement musical research-action paths in the classroom and in other contexts, with inclusive purposes. Some examples of the students’ outcomes will be presented. Strengths and weakness of the project will be introduced and discussed.

Promoting inclusive musical experience: University programme for teacher music education

Addessi Anna Rita
2021

Abstract

Background. The research on the beneficial effects of music possesses a remarkable role in all areas of music education, health, and social care (Bunt 2012; Imberty 2005; MacDonald 2013). The efficacy of music for inclusion is affirmed by the World Health Organization (2001) and the participation to musical activities is considered a human right (Lubet 2011). However, the musical experience becomes inclusive if it is implemented in the framework of “inclusive school” (Canevaro et al. 2011). In this framework, the education of teachers and social workers is particularly relevant (Clough, et al. 2017): What skills must a teacher possess to satisfy human musicality in inclusive contexts and to promote well-being relationships? The university module Objectives: A Post Graduate Programme was developed at the University of Bologna, in the framework of the European Projects STALWARTS (Addessi 2019; Krüger et al. 2020), aimed at those who are interested in acquiring professional skills in music education and inclusion. The aims were to develop a professional profile based on the following competences: basic musical competences, technical-professional competences, and transversal competences. Methodology. Participatory action research: the participants (students, teachers, researchers) were involved in the planning of the contents and activities of the university programme, as well during the assessment procedure, by means interviews, workshops, meetings, questionnaires, focus groups. Participants: 28 students (musicians, teachers, professionals of education, music therapists, social workers); researchers and teachers of the STALWARTS project and the University. Contents: Workshops on musical creativity, improvisation and movement were implemented with the aim to develop basic and professional competences. Lectures on inclusive pedagogy, human musicality, neuroscience and music, flow, reflexive interaction, ethical framework, small-scale inquires were realised with the aim to develop professional and transversal competences. A tool kit was implemented, including observational grids and guide for small-scale inquiries. Data collected. The students were asked to draw their ideal of kindergarten and primary teacher during music classroom activities, before and after the university modules. Evaluation questionnaire of teaching activities was administered 
to the students. The learning outputs have been verified step by step through self and peer evaluation, and at the end by means small-scale inquiries realised by the participants in their working places. Results The analysis of the students’ drawings showed that their social representations about music education, inclusion and role of the teacher, changed during the implementation of the programme. Self and peer evaluations consolidate several reflective notes about music experience and inclusion. The students’ small-scale inquiries showed that they acquire both some basic research tools and abilities in the field of music education and inclusion. The students’ assessment of the module was positive. Conclusions The results of the university programme highlighted the importance of the university education of the operators and teachers who work in inclusive contexts. They show that the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and practical skills related to musical education in inclusive contexts is possible and that these competences allow teachers to plan and implement musical research-action paths in the classroom and in other contexts, with inclusive purposes. Some examples of the students’ outcomes will be presented. Strengths and weakness of the project will be introduced and discussed.
Perspectives of Psychology of Music and Music Educatio, International Conference of CIPEM , Book of Abstracts
22
23
Addessi Anna Rita
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/845331
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