Population ageing is a well-known phenomenon of European societies. Although population ageing has not always nor everywhere translated into an increasing number of individuals who need long-term care support, a number of studies have suggested that there is no clear trend towards a compression of morbidity, or that this trend cannot fully compensate for the progressive increase of elderly individuals. As a consequence, it is expected that the need for care services will significantly increase in the coming decades This suggests that the possibility (or not) of receiving informal care in later life will be an increasingly relevant dimension along which inequalities in well-being later life are structured. Inequalities in care support – given and received – are clearly the result not only of individuals and household’s situation at the moment in which care needs arise, but also of their life course. Adopting the instruments and analytical approach typically utilized in the studies of economic inequalities, the present contribution aims at: first, shedding light on the level of inequality of the distribution care support (given and received) characterizing different European societies; second, providing evidence of the negative association between the lack of reciprocity in social support exchange and older individuals’ well-being; third, assessing which are the main factors associated with the risk that an older person is in the situation of receiving large amounts of informal social support, both from kin and non-kin members, without being able to reciprocate.

Care inequality in later life in ageing societies

Albertini, Marco
Primo
;
Prandini, Riccardo
Secondo
2021

Abstract

Population ageing is a well-known phenomenon of European societies. Although population ageing has not always nor everywhere translated into an increasing number of individuals who need long-term care support, a number of studies have suggested that there is no clear trend towards a compression of morbidity, or that this trend cannot fully compensate for the progressive increase of elderly individuals. As a consequence, it is expected that the need for care services will significantly increase in the coming decades This suggests that the possibility (or not) of receiving informal care in later life will be an increasingly relevant dimension along which inequalities in well-being later life are structured. Inequalities in care support – given and received – are clearly the result not only of individuals and household’s situation at the moment in which care needs arise, but also of their life course. Adopting the instruments and analytical approach typically utilized in the studies of economic inequalities, the present contribution aims at: first, shedding light on the level of inequality of the distribution care support (given and received) characterizing different European societies; second, providing evidence of the negative association between the lack of reciprocity in social support exchange and older individuals’ well-being; third, assessing which are the main factors associated with the risk that an older person is in the situation of receiving large amounts of informal social support, both from kin and non-kin members, without being able to reciprocate.
The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Inequalities and the Life Course
274
284
Albertini, Marco; Prandini, Riccardo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/842044
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