This paper is a critical analysis of the relation between immigration and crime/criminalisation in Italy, with particular reference to “second-generation” immigrants enrolled in the eighth grade of a sample of junior high schools in Bologna (Italy). The paper investigates whether – after allowing for differences in sex, social class, and other relevant variables – significant differences in self-reported deviance would emerge between second-generation immigrants and Italians. The research draws on three major criminological theories about deviant behavior: social control theory, labeling approach, and culture conflict theory. The study has been conducted as a self-report survey of a sample of 335 students enrolled in the 8th grade of 4 junior high schools in the metropolitan area of Bologna (Italy). Respondents were administered a questionnaire in the classroom, and asked to answer questions focusing on socio-biographical factors, socio-economic conditions, value-orientation, and self-reported deviant behaviors. Regression analysis was conducted on the data, and an interpretative model was developed based on the findings. The research offers no evidence of a higher frequency or seriousness of self-reported deviance among young “second-generation” immigrants compared to Italians. The findings suggest that – both for Italian and immigrant respondents – self-reported deviant behaviors appear to be strongly correlated with cultural/generational conflict, the perception of stigma, and weak family bonds. The paper offers an original contribution to scholarly research about migration and crime/criminalisation. More specifically, it supports those criminological studies which deny any role of migration or national origin in the etiology of criminal behaviors.

The ‘Normality’ of ‘Second Generations’ in Italy and the Importance of Legal Status: A Self-Report Delinquency Study.

MELOSSI, DARIO;DE GIORGI, ALESSANDRO;MASSA, ESTER
2009

Abstract

This paper is a critical analysis of the relation between immigration and crime/criminalisation in Italy, with particular reference to “second-generation” immigrants enrolled in the eighth grade of a sample of junior high schools in Bologna (Italy). The paper investigates whether – after allowing for differences in sex, social class, and other relevant variables – significant differences in self-reported deviance would emerge between second-generation immigrants and Italians. The research draws on three major criminological theories about deviant behavior: social control theory, labeling approach, and culture conflict theory. The study has been conducted as a self-report survey of a sample of 335 students enrolled in the 8th grade of 4 junior high schools in the metropolitan area of Bologna (Italy). Respondents were administered a questionnaire in the classroom, and asked to answer questions focusing on socio-biographical factors, socio-economic conditions, value-orientation, and self-reported deviant behaviors. Regression analysis was conducted on the data, and an interpretative model was developed based on the findings. The research offers no evidence of a higher frequency or seriousness of self-reported deviance among young “second-generation” immigrants compared to Italians. The findings suggest that – both for Italian and immigrant respondents – self-reported deviant behaviors appear to be strongly correlated with cultural/generational conflict, the perception of stigma, and weak family bonds. The paper offers an original contribution to scholarly research about migration and crime/criminalisation. More specifically, it supports those criminological studies which deny any role of migration or national origin in the etiology of criminal behaviors.
2009
Immigration, Crime and Justice.
47
65
D.Melossi; A. De Giorgi; E. Massa
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/75949
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