Background: Outcome prediction allows patients and professionals to formulate a management plan and to identify risk for poor prognosis. The BPI measures pain and psychosocial outcomes of chronic pain (CP); the Mainz Pain Staging System (MPSS) is a multi-dimensional measure of the CP stage (I-III). Aims: to analyse the association of BPI measures and the MPSS stage and to verify whether the NPSS may predict outcome in Low Back CP. Methods: We enrolled N=242 patients with lumbosacral Pain who were followed for approx. 60 days. Follow up and treatments occurred at 20 days interval being T1 the admission day and T4 the 60th day after admission. The MPSS was administered at T1 while the BPI from T1 to T4. Measures for analysis were patients' demographics, MPSS stage and BPI item scores. Results: Mean age was 65,7 (±15,2) and 75,6% were females; lumbosacral pain was coupled with sciatica syndrome in 79,8%; MPSS stage (I-III) proportions were: 7,9%, 41,3% and 50,8%, respectively. Statistically significant associations were found between MPSS-III category, the female gender and advanced age (66-80 years); and between MPSS-I category and young adults (21-35 years). Among MPSS-II/III patients, pain interference with the patient's mood significantly decreased from T1 to T4 while scores of worst pain in the past 24h significantly decreased only among MPSS-I/II patients. Conclusions: Following Low Back CP treatment, caregiver may expect poor pain relief among MPSS-III patients. However, continuous multidisciplinary approach significantly improves these patient's quality of life. Prediction of prognosis has wide implications for public health initiatives.

CAN THE STAGING OF CHRONIC PAIN PREDICT OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN?

SAMOLSKY DEKEL, BOAZ GEDALIAHU;CAPOZZI, CHIARA;LANZA, MARIA CONCETTA;PENAZZI, MATILDE;SORELLA, MARIA CRISTINA;CAROSI, FRANCESCA;MELOTTI, RITA MARIA;DI NINO, GIANFRANCO
2009

Abstract

Background: Outcome prediction allows patients and professionals to formulate a management plan and to identify risk for poor prognosis. The BPI measures pain and psychosocial outcomes of chronic pain (CP); the Mainz Pain Staging System (MPSS) is a multi-dimensional measure of the CP stage (I-III). Aims: to analyse the association of BPI measures and the MPSS stage and to verify whether the NPSS may predict outcome in Low Back CP. Methods: We enrolled N=242 patients with lumbosacral Pain who were followed for approx. 60 days. Follow up and treatments occurred at 20 days interval being T1 the admission day and T4 the 60th day after admission. The MPSS was administered at T1 while the BPI from T1 to T4. Measures for analysis were patients' demographics, MPSS stage and BPI item scores. Results: Mean age was 65,7 (±15,2) and 75,6% were females; lumbosacral pain was coupled with sciatica syndrome in 79,8%; MPSS stage (I-III) proportions were: 7,9%, 41,3% and 50,8%, respectively. Statistically significant associations were found between MPSS-III category, the female gender and advanced age (66-80 years); and between MPSS-I category and young adults (21-35 years). Among MPSS-II/III patients, pain interference with the patient's mood significantly decreased from T1 to T4 while scores of worst pain in the past 24h significantly decreased only among MPSS-I/II patients. Conclusions: Following Low Back CP treatment, caregiver may expect poor pain relief among MPSS-III patients. However, continuous multidisciplinary approach significantly improves these patient's quality of life. Prediction of prognosis has wide implications for public health initiatives.
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BG. Samolsky Dekel; C. Capozzi; MC. Lanza; M. Penazzi; MC. Sorela; F. Carosi; RM. Melotti; G. Di Nino
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/75708
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