Waste management in the Campania region is a major concern. Increased cancer rates have been documented in people residing in areas nearby Naples characterized by illegal dumping and waste incineration. Pets play a useful tool as sentinel for disease. Possible associations between hazardous waste emission and cancer in pets were investigated in areas under direct influence of waste disposal. A hospital-based case-control study in Naples (unexposed) and nearby cities having a history of illegal waste dumping (exposed) was carried out. Tumor frequency was compared between the two areas and relative risks were calculated for various malignancies. 453 cancer cases and 3799 controls were included. A significant increased risk for cancer development was identified in pets residing in exposed areas (P < 0.001; RR: 3.91; 95% CI: 3.29-4.64). In the same areas, the risk of developing concurrent malignancies, leukaemia, lymphoma, mast cell tumour, hepatic tumours, mammary cancer, hemangiosarcoma, osteosarcoma and other sarcomas increased between 3.18- and 7.99-fold. Waste emission from illegal dumping sites greatly increases cancer risk in pets permanently residing in exposed areas. The same tumours diagnosed here have been previously recognized in humans living close to illegal waste dumps. Thus, epidemiological studies of spontaneous tumours in pets may provide insight into the role of environmental factors in human cancers and may predict environmental health hazards for humans.

CANCER RISK LINKED TO WASTE CRISIS IN COMPANION ANIMALS AND THEIR ROLE AS MARKERS OF EFFECT: A HOSPITAL-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY IN NAPLES (ITALY)

L. Marconato;BETTINI, GIULIANO;
2008

Abstract

Waste management in the Campania region is a major concern. Increased cancer rates have been documented in people residing in areas nearby Naples characterized by illegal dumping and waste incineration. Pets play a useful tool as sentinel for disease. Possible associations between hazardous waste emission and cancer in pets were investigated in areas under direct influence of waste disposal. A hospital-based case-control study in Naples (unexposed) and nearby cities having a history of illegal waste dumping (exposed) was carried out. Tumor frequency was compared between the two areas and relative risks were calculated for various malignancies. 453 cancer cases and 3799 controls were included. A significant increased risk for cancer development was identified in pets residing in exposed areas (P < 0.001; RR: 3.91; 95% CI: 3.29-4.64). In the same areas, the risk of developing concurrent malignancies, leukaemia, lymphoma, mast cell tumour, hepatic tumours, mammary cancer, hemangiosarcoma, osteosarcoma and other sarcomas increased between 3.18- and 7.99-fold. Waste emission from illegal dumping sites greatly increases cancer risk in pets permanently residing in exposed areas. The same tumours diagnosed here have been previously recognized in humans living close to illegal waste dumps. Thus, epidemiological studies of spontaneous tumours in pets may provide insight into the role of environmental factors in human cancers and may predict environmental health hazards for humans.
Proceedings 18th ECVIM-CA Congress,
40
40
L. Marconato; C. Leo; R. Girelli; S. Salvi; F. Abramo; G. Bettini; S. Comazzi; E. Zini
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/73432
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