Extreme heat events and urban heat island effect are among the major problems the humanity is currently facing in association with the increasing urbanization. Both these problems, besides being related to bad life quality of urban citizens, also determine a large energy consumption leading to increased emissions of air quality pollutants within a context already stressed by various sources of pollutants (Salamanca et al., 2014). Urban heat island and the various problems related to the thermal conditions of the urban environment are frequently observed in highly urbanized areas (Hunt et al., 2017). Several studies have been conducted on the Urban Heat Island (UHI) using both experimental and modeling techniques. The spatial and temporal distribution of air temperature within a city is strongly depend on meteorological factors and on various parameters of the city texture such as its density, morphology and material of buildings, as well as thermal emissions associated to human activities (Yang et al., 2010). In this work, we will present an analysis of numerical simulations of Urban Heat Island effect in a medium-size city of the Po Valley (Bologna, Italy) conducted with two different models, i.e. one temperature perturbation type namely the ADMS-Temperature and Humidity Model (ADMS-TH) and one mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, namely the WRF model. The temperature perturbation-type is able to resolve local temperature variations at street scale, taking into account both meteorological variables and all the parameters related to the use of soil and the objects such as buildings and other anthropogenic sources and trees that are included in the domain. This model was previously validated against meteorological observations with good accuracy in Lecce, where it was demonstrated that it is capable to predict correctly temperature and humidity daily trends, with higher accuracy than simplified computational fluid dynamics simulations (Maggiotto et al., 2014) The WRF mesoscale meteorological model is capable to simulate the 2m-temperature in the inner city with a resolution of hundreds of meters by the means of different urban parameterizations. Moreover, the effect of the buildings and of the canopies on the energy balance of the city can be taken into account by means of the Building Effect Parameterization (BEP) and Building Energy (BEM) parameterizations, both implemented in WRF. The performance of the two models is verified comparing with the meteorological observations conducted in the urban area of Bologna by the Emilia Romagna Environmental Protection Agency (ARPAE) network. Specifically, we will highlight advantages and disadvantages of each model type, focusing on a case study in summer 2017. Conclusions will be derived for adoption of the two models in the setting up of heat mitigation strategies in Italian cities.

Predictions of the urban temperature distribution using two different scale model approaches: an analysis of pros and cons for heat mitigation strategy

Di Nicola F.;Marco A. Santo;Marcello Iotti;Francesco Barbano;Erika Brattich;Di Sabatino S.
2019

Abstract

Extreme heat events and urban heat island effect are among the major problems the humanity is currently facing in association with the increasing urbanization. Both these problems, besides being related to bad life quality of urban citizens, also determine a large energy consumption leading to increased emissions of air quality pollutants within a context already stressed by various sources of pollutants (Salamanca et al., 2014). Urban heat island and the various problems related to the thermal conditions of the urban environment are frequently observed in highly urbanized areas (Hunt et al., 2017). Several studies have been conducted on the Urban Heat Island (UHI) using both experimental and modeling techniques. The spatial and temporal distribution of air temperature within a city is strongly depend on meteorological factors and on various parameters of the city texture such as its density, morphology and material of buildings, as well as thermal emissions associated to human activities (Yang et al., 2010). In this work, we will present an analysis of numerical simulations of Urban Heat Island effect in a medium-size city of the Po Valley (Bologna, Italy) conducted with two different models, i.e. one temperature perturbation type namely the ADMS-Temperature and Humidity Model (ADMS-TH) and one mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, namely the WRF model. The temperature perturbation-type is able to resolve local temperature variations at street scale, taking into account both meteorological variables and all the parameters related to the use of soil and the objects such as buildings and other anthropogenic sources and trees that are included in the domain. This model was previously validated against meteorological observations with good accuracy in Lecce, where it was demonstrated that it is capable to predict correctly temperature and humidity daily trends, with higher accuracy than simplified computational fluid dynamics simulations (Maggiotto et al., 2014) The WRF mesoscale meteorological model is capable to simulate the 2m-temperature in the inner city with a resolution of hundreds of meters by the means of different urban parameterizations. Moreover, the effect of the buildings and of the canopies on the energy balance of the city can be taken into account by means of the Building Effect Parameterization (BEP) and Building Energy (BEM) parameterizations, both implemented in WRF. The performance of the two models is verified comparing with the meteorological observations conducted in the urban area of Bologna by the Emilia Romagna Environmental Protection Agency (ARPAE) network. Specifically, we will highlight advantages and disadvantages of each model type, focusing on a case study in summer 2017. Conclusions will be derived for adoption of the two models in the setting up of heat mitigation strategies in Italian cities.
2° Congresso Nazionale AISAM
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Di Nicola F., Marco A. Santo, Marcello Iotti, Paolo Testori, Francesco Barbano, Erika Brattich, Di Sabatino S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/728209
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