South Korea’s economic growth in the last few decades has undeniably had major repercussions on its foreign policy, in particular towards developing countries. Starting from a condition of aid recipient, Seoul has transformed itself into a developed nation and a donor. Also, as a growing middle power with limited domestic natural resources, South Korea has had the necessity to establish, expand, and consolidate its relations with resource-rich countries in the globe. Lastly, its export-led economic model requires continuous access to new markets for its products. For this reason, Seoul has solidly positioned itself in most of the developing world. If South Korea’s foreign policy towards major powers and in the region has always been influenced by the political orientation of the government – progressive or conservative – the attitude towards the developing world has remained largely uninfluenced by this divide. Both conservatives and progressives have, in fact, looked at it as an important possibility for acquiring natural resources, new markets in which to invest and export, and new horizons for sustainable development. This chapter analyses South Korea’s relations with Central Asia, Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Arctic region, emphasizing the continuity among South Korean governments of different – and opposed – political nature and vision.

Crossing boundaries: South Korea's global diplomacy outside Northeast Asia

Antonio, Fiori;Andrea, Passeri
2019

Abstract

South Korea’s economic growth in the last few decades has undeniably had major repercussions on its foreign policy, in particular towards developing countries. Starting from a condition of aid recipient, Seoul has transformed itself into a developed nation and a donor. Also, as a growing middle power with limited domestic natural resources, South Korea has had the necessity to establish, expand, and consolidate its relations with resource-rich countries in the globe. Lastly, its export-led economic model requires continuous access to new markets for its products. For this reason, Seoul has solidly positioned itself in most of the developing world. If South Korea’s foreign policy towards major powers and in the region has always been influenced by the political orientation of the government – progressive or conservative – the attitude towards the developing world has remained largely uninfluenced by this divide. Both conservatives and progressives have, in fact, looked at it as an important possibility for acquiring natural resources, new markets in which to invest and export, and new horizons for sustainable development. This chapter analyses South Korea’s relations with Central Asia, Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Arctic region, emphasizing the continuity among South Korean governments of different – and opposed – political nature and vision.
The Korean Paradox. Domestic Political Divide and Foreign Policy in South Korea
157
178
Antonio, Fiori; Kevin, Gray; Soyeun, Kim; Andrea, Passeri
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/688893
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