This chapter analyses South Korea’s foreign policy after the election of the first progressive president, Kim Dae-jung, in 1997, which marked the first transfer of power between conservatives and progressives in the country’s history. Through a chronological reconstruction of the evolution of South Korea’s foreign policy over the following four presidencies, the chapter shows how the different political traditions interpreted the main challenges from the regional and international environment. The differences between progressive (1998–2008) and conservative (2008–2017) administrations led to different interpretations of the country’s priorities and interests and consequently to the implementation of different foreign policy strategies. The chapter also analyses the growing impact of the “Asian paradox” on South Korea’s foreign policy and assesses its consequences, in particular regarding South Korea’s relations with China and the U.S. under the presidency of Park Geun-hye. In doing so, the chapter emphasizes Park’s efforts to adapt the existing conservative political tradition to address the new challenges that have emerged in recent years.

The impact of political alternation on South Korea's foreign policy

Antonio, Fiori;Marco, Milani
2019

Abstract

This chapter analyses South Korea’s foreign policy after the election of the first progressive president, Kim Dae-jung, in 1997, which marked the first transfer of power between conservatives and progressives in the country’s history. Through a chronological reconstruction of the evolution of South Korea’s foreign policy over the following four presidencies, the chapter shows how the different political traditions interpreted the main challenges from the regional and international environment. The differences between progressive (1998–2008) and conservative (2008–2017) administrations led to different interpretations of the country’s priorities and interests and consequently to the implementation of different foreign policy strategies. The chapter also analyses the growing impact of the “Asian paradox” on South Korea’s foreign policy and assesses its consequences, in particular regarding South Korea’s relations with China and the U.S. under the presidency of Park Geun-hye. In doing so, the chapter emphasizes Park’s efforts to adapt the existing conservative political tradition to address the new challenges that have emerged in recent years.
The Korean Paradox. Domestic Political Divide and Foreign Policy in South Korea
30
53
Antonio, Fiori; Marco, Milani
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/688891
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