The concept of a Social Investment welfare paradigm has become highly influential in public policy globally (Deeming and Smyth, 2017). At its heart lies the idea that welfare states must invest to strengthen skills and capacities, beginning in early life. Social Investment therefore refers to policies and interventions that aim to build the productive capacities of citizens (Deeming and Smyth, 2015). Typical examples include labour market activation and early years education and care (Hemerijck, 2017). According to the European Commission, ‘[S]ocial investment policies reinforce social policies that protect and stabilise by addressing some of the causes of disadvantage and giving people tools with which to improve their social situations’ (European Commission 2013: 3). Many countries – including but not limited to members states of the European Union - have adopted some elements of Social Investment although uptake is far from uniform (Bouget et al., 2015). The aim of this book is to advance empirical and conceptual insight into the Social Investment welfare paradigm from a social innovation and a sub national perspective. Drawing upon multi-national research under Horizon 2000 Societal Challenges, chapter authors offer new evidence about the regional and local realities of Social Investment policies and programmes, and original analysis informed by engagement with service users and local communities affected.

Implementing innovative social investment: Strategic lessons from Europe

Bassi Andrea
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2019

Abstract

The concept of a Social Investment welfare paradigm has become highly influential in public policy globally (Deeming and Smyth, 2017). At its heart lies the idea that welfare states must invest to strengthen skills and capacities, beginning in early life. Social Investment therefore refers to policies and interventions that aim to build the productive capacities of citizens (Deeming and Smyth, 2015). Typical examples include labour market activation and early years education and care (Hemerijck, 2017). According to the European Commission, ‘[S]ocial investment policies reinforce social policies that protect and stabilise by addressing some of the causes of disadvantage and giving people tools with which to improve their social situations’ (European Commission 2013: 3). Many countries – including but not limited to members states of the European Union - have adopted some elements of Social Investment although uptake is far from uniform (Bouget et al., 2015). The aim of this book is to advance empirical and conceptual insight into the Social Investment welfare paradigm from a social innovation and a sub national perspective. Drawing upon multi-national research under Horizon 2000 Societal Challenges, chapter authors offer new evidence about the regional and local realities of Social Investment policies and programmes, and original analysis informed by engagement with service users and local communities affected.
224
978-1-4473-4782-8
Baines Susan, Bassi Andrea, Csoba Judit, Sipos Florian
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/653528
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