In this chapter I analyze the role played by Mohammed VI in the process of transition from the autocratic regime of Hassan II. In particular, I argue that Mohammed VI has guaranteed his country only a limited transition: in fact, although the adoption of the 2011 constitution is effectively a sign of greater democratization of the country, for the time being Morocco continues to be a hybrid regime, in which the king remains the fulcrum of the political and institutional system. Accordingly, this chapter proceeds as follows. In the first part I examine the move from the autocratic regime of Hassan II to the hybrid regime of Mohammed VI. I then indicate the reasons that led part of the Moroccan people to demonstrate against the regime in February 2011, and the measures by which the king managed to calm the protest demonstrations. Afterwards, I show that the constituent process was driven by Mohammed VI and was characterized by some major democratic deficits. I then examine the new arrangements introduced by the 2011 constitution to regulate the form of government including, in particular, the rules on the division of powers between the sovereign and the head of government. I show that, despite what is formally stated in the constitution, Morocco has not become a parliamentary monarchy. Subsequently, I underline that for the moment the head of government, Abdelilah Benkirane, has not established himself as a serious “counterweight” to the king, and that the process of constitutional implementation is proceeding quite slowly.

The Pilot of Limited Change. Mohammed VI and the Transition in Morocco / Francesco Biagi. - STAMPA. - (2014), pp. 50-80.

The Pilot of Limited Change. Mohammed VI and the Transition in Morocco

BIAGI, FRANCESCO
2014

Abstract

In this chapter I analyze the role played by Mohammed VI in the process of transition from the autocratic regime of Hassan II. In particular, I argue that Mohammed VI has guaranteed his country only a limited transition: in fact, although the adoption of the 2011 constitution is effectively a sign of greater democratization of the country, for the time being Morocco continues to be a hybrid regime, in which the king remains the fulcrum of the political and institutional system. Accordingly, this chapter proceeds as follows. In the first part I examine the move from the autocratic regime of Hassan II to the hybrid regime of Mohammed VI. I then indicate the reasons that led part of the Moroccan people to demonstrate against the regime in February 2011, and the measures by which the king managed to calm the protest demonstrations. Afterwards, I show that the constituent process was driven by Mohammed VI and was characterized by some major democratic deficits. I then examine the new arrangements introduced by the 2011 constitution to regulate the form of government including, in particular, the rules on the division of powers between the sovereign and the head of government. I show that, despite what is formally stated in the constitution, Morocco has not become a parliamentary monarchy. Subsequently, I underline that for the moment the head of government, Abdelilah Benkirane, has not established himself as a serious “counterweight” to the king, and that the process of constitutional implementation is proceeding quite slowly.
2014
Political and Constitutional Transitions in North Africa: Actors and Factors
50
80
The Pilot of Limited Change. Mohammed VI and the Transition in Morocco / Francesco Biagi. - STAMPA. - (2014), pp. 50-80.
Francesco Biagi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/396944
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