Intestinal parasites has been traditionally regarded as a possible cause of horse colic (Love, 1992, Equine Vet. J., 24:5-9); however, the evidence of small strongyles causing intestinal disorders has never been clearly demonstrated and the evidence of parasites causing colic in horse was recently questioned (Uhlinger, 2007, Vet. Clin. North Am. Equine Pract., 23:509-517). Aim of the study was the comparison of parasitological status between subjects with or without colic syndrome, with particular regard to small strongyles infections. Quali-quantitative coprological analysis were performed on 86 horses referred to the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences: 43 horses with colic (22 and 21 treated with medical or surgical management, respectively) and 43 horses referred for different reasons (controls). Coprocolture was performed on positive samples to differentiate small strongyles and S. vulgaris infections. Data were analysed using STATA 11.2. Strongyle egg prevalence was 39.5%, the mean number of eggs per gram of faeces (epg) was 145.34. Four horses (4.6%) had S. vulgaris infection. Negative binomial multiple regression highlighted no influence of horse sex on epg, while there was a negative relationship between age (in month) and epg; the same analysis revealed a significant difference of epg (p<0.05) between control horses (mean epg=178.1) and horses with surgical colic (mean epg=68.6) when controlling for S. vulgaris prevalence including it in the model. Medical colic (mean epg=154.5) did not significantly differ from controls. The unexpected negative relationship between cyathostomine infection and the severity of colic syndrome raises questions about the role of these parasites in intestinal damage and occurrence of colic in horses. It is possible that the presence of adult luminal parasites, inhibiting mucosal larvae (Eysker et al., 1989, Vet. Parasitol., 34:87-93), would have a protective effect against the pathogenic action exerted by the development and emergence of small strongyles larvae from intestinal mucosa.

Are small strongyles (Cyathostominae) involved in horse colic occurrence?

STANCAMPIANO, LAURA;SPADARI, ALESSANDRO;RINNOVATI, RICCARDO
2014

Abstract

Intestinal parasites has been traditionally regarded as a possible cause of horse colic (Love, 1992, Equine Vet. J., 24:5-9); however, the evidence of small strongyles causing intestinal disorders has never been clearly demonstrated and the evidence of parasites causing colic in horse was recently questioned (Uhlinger, 2007, Vet. Clin. North Am. Equine Pract., 23:509-517). Aim of the study was the comparison of parasitological status between subjects with or without colic syndrome, with particular regard to small strongyles infections. Quali-quantitative coprological analysis were performed on 86 horses referred to the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences: 43 horses with colic (22 and 21 treated with medical or surgical management, respectively) and 43 horses referred for different reasons (controls). Coprocolture was performed on positive samples to differentiate small strongyles and S. vulgaris infections. Data were analysed using STATA 11.2. Strongyle egg prevalence was 39.5%, the mean number of eggs per gram of faeces (epg) was 145.34. Four horses (4.6%) had S. vulgaris infection. Negative binomial multiple regression highlighted no influence of horse sex on epg, while there was a negative relationship between age (in month) and epg; the same analysis revealed a significant difference of epg (p<0.05) between control horses (mean epg=178.1) and horses with surgical colic (mean epg=68.6) when controlling for S. vulgaris prevalence including it in the model. Medical colic (mean epg=154.5) did not significantly differ from controls. The unexpected negative relationship between cyathostomine infection and the severity of colic syndrome raises questions about the role of these parasites in intestinal damage and occurrence of colic in horses. It is possible that the presence of adult luminal parasites, inhibiting mucosal larvae (Eysker et al., 1989, Vet. Parasitol., 34:87-93), would have a protective effect against the pathogenic action exerted by the development and emergence of small strongyles larvae from intestinal mucosa.
XXVIII Congresso Nazionale
106
106
Laura STANCAMPIANO; Andrea MARIGO; Alessandro SPADARI; Riccardo RINNOVATI
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/356916
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