The Palaeogenic turbiditic sedimentation in the Eastern Southern Alps has been considered to represent the sedimentary response to tectonic activity related to the Mesoalpine phase which involved the chain from Late Palaeocene onwards. According to many Authors, these turbiditic deposits were made by sediments eroded from the Dinaric thrust belt, but no compositional and sedimentological data have yet been furnished to support this idea. Field and petrographic analyses have permitted to define these turbiditic successions (Claut Flysch, Late Palaeocene; Belluno F., Early-Middle Eocene; Clauzetto F., Early Eocene) as multisource deposits, as demonstrated by the common presence of allochemical, mainly bioclastic detritus, interbedded with terrigenous arenites. For all units, field data suggest a more proximal area for allochemical supply and a more distal for terrigenous sources, which have been characterized by the important presence of chert, carbonate rocks and metamorphites. All the investigated successions display transparent heavy mineral associations, not abundant, but significatively marked by the presence of brown spinel, alcaline amphibole, staurolite, epidote, zoisite, pointing to common metamorphic sources. The location of the source of metamorphic rocks is debatable, but probably linked to the internal Dinaric belt of Vardar area, while the source of the allochemical detritus was localized in the Friuli Platform. This was a "carbonate factory" since Late Jurassic and during Cretaceous and has been re-activated some times in the Tertiary.

Petrographic signature of Paleogenic turbiditic sedimentation in north-eastern Italy

ZATTIN, MASSIMILIANO;
2004

Abstract

The Palaeogenic turbiditic sedimentation in the Eastern Southern Alps has been considered to represent the sedimentary response to tectonic activity related to the Mesoalpine phase which involved the chain from Late Palaeocene onwards. According to many Authors, these turbiditic deposits were made by sediments eroded from the Dinaric thrust belt, but no compositional and sedimentological data have yet been furnished to support this idea. Field and petrographic analyses have permitted to define these turbiditic successions (Claut Flysch, Late Palaeocene; Belluno F., Early-Middle Eocene; Clauzetto F., Early Eocene) as multisource deposits, as demonstrated by the common presence of allochemical, mainly bioclastic detritus, interbedded with terrigenous arenites. For all units, field data suggest a more proximal area for allochemical supply and a more distal for terrigenous sources, which have been characterized by the important presence of chert, carbonate rocks and metamorphites. All the investigated successions display transparent heavy mineral associations, not abundant, but significatively marked by the presence of brown spinel, alcaline amphibole, staurolite, epidote, zoisite, pointing to common metamorphic sources. The location of the source of metamorphic rocks is debatable, but probably linked to the internal Dinaric belt of Vardar area, while the source of the allochemical detritus was localized in the Friuli Platform. This was a "carbonate factory" since Late Jurassic and during Cretaceous and has been re-activated some times in the Tertiary.
Abstracts
Stefani C.; Zattin M.; Grandesso P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/15195
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