Is there a European identity? Whether there is or not, what impact does this have on the legitimacy of the European Union? Can the EU be legitimate even without a European ‘we-feeling’ based on identity? And whether this can or cannot be the case, what impact might legitimacy have on European identity? These are the kinds of question which have generated countless detailed arguments and counter-arguments within a wide range of disciplines over the past decades. But rather than generating a cross-disciplinary give-and- take producing fruitful debates over the concepts of identity and legitimacy, they mainly produced a cacophony of separate disciplinary voices. The aim of the chapter (and the whole book) is to take us beyond the limits of the literature and let scholars from different disciplines and theoretical perspectives interact with each other on specific ways of looking at the two concepts, that is, on issues of identity and legitimacy in relation to Europe and the European Union (EU). The result is interesting and challenging at the same time: not only have different understandings of the concepts and their interrelations emerged, but different views of possible pathways to the construction of a political identity and legitimacy in/for the EU have also been proposed. A further intellectual challenge is represented by the contrasting views over the most suitable research methods to study issues of identity and legitimacy, in general and in the EU in particular. This conclusion deals with each of these three results and closes with an overall evaluation of the state of research on this topic as well as on the future of identity and legitimacy in/of the EU.

Debating Identity and Legitimacy in the EU: Concluding Remarks

LUCARELLI, SONIA
2011

Abstract

Is there a European identity? Whether there is or not, what impact does this have on the legitimacy of the European Union? Can the EU be legitimate even without a European ‘we-feeling’ based on identity? And whether this can or cannot be the case, what impact might legitimacy have on European identity? These are the kinds of question which have generated countless detailed arguments and counter-arguments within a wide range of disciplines over the past decades. But rather than generating a cross-disciplinary give-and- take producing fruitful debates over the concepts of identity and legitimacy, they mainly produced a cacophony of separate disciplinary voices. The aim of the chapter (and the whole book) is to take us beyond the limits of the literature and let scholars from different disciplines and theoretical perspectives interact with each other on specific ways of looking at the two concepts, that is, on issues of identity and legitimacy in relation to Europe and the European Union (EU). The result is interesting and challenging at the same time: not only have different understandings of the concepts and their interrelations emerged, but different views of possible pathways to the construction of a political identity and legitimacy in/for the EU have also been proposed. A further intellectual challenge is represented by the contrasting views over the most suitable research methods to study issues of identity and legitimacy, in general and in the EU in particular. This conclusion deals with each of these three results and closes with an overall evaluation of the state of research on this topic as well as on the future of identity and legitimacy in/of the EU.
Debating political identity and legitimacy in the European Union
193
206
S. Lucarelli
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/101631
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact