Background: To date, no prospective study has been conducted to investigate the role of socioeconomic status (SES) on clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) in Italy, where there is a National Health Service that provides universal coverage regardless of the patient's economic status. Methods: We performed a prospective observational study investigating the association between SES and survival in GBM patients at our institution, a hub centre for brain cancer research and treatment. We included GBM patients who underwent medical treatment or chemo-radiation between April 2017 and December 2017. The SES was measured using the income-brackets, attributed by the Italian Ministry of Finance on the basis of the income of the fiscal family unit, referring to the previous year. Results: One hundred and six patients were included in the study. In multivariate analysis, overall survival (OS) correlated significantly with higher-income (HR = 0.623.95% CI 0.467–0.832; p = 0.001) and MGMT methylation status (HR = 0.158.95% CI 0.082–0.304; P < 0.001). When adjusted for age, performance status and extension of surgery, survival benefit remained superior for higher-income HR = 0.641 (95% CI 0.478–0.858; p = 0.003) and MGMT methylated tumours HR = 0.167 (95% CI 0.084–0.331; p < 0.001). Conclusions: SES is an important determinant of prognosis in GBM even in the Italian National Health Service, which provides universal, largely free and relatively comprehensive healthcare. Despite aspirations to achieve equality in healthcare, socioeconomic differences exist and may impact the clinical outcome.

Association between socioeconomic status and survival in glioblastoma: An Italian single-centre prospective observational study

Gatto Lidia;Franceschi Enrico;Di Nunno Vincenzo;Lodi Raffaele;Di Battista Monica;
2021

Abstract

Background: To date, no prospective study has been conducted to investigate the role of socioeconomic status (SES) on clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) in Italy, where there is a National Health Service that provides universal coverage regardless of the patient's economic status. Methods: We performed a prospective observational study investigating the association between SES and survival in GBM patients at our institution, a hub centre for brain cancer research and treatment. We included GBM patients who underwent medical treatment or chemo-radiation between April 2017 and December 2017. The SES was measured using the income-brackets, attributed by the Italian Ministry of Finance on the basis of the income of the fiscal family unit, referring to the previous year. Results: One hundred and six patients were included in the study. In multivariate analysis, overall survival (OS) correlated significantly with higher-income (HR = 0.623.95% CI 0.467–0.832; p = 0.001) and MGMT methylation status (HR = 0.158.95% CI 0.082–0.304; P < 0.001). When adjusted for age, performance status and extension of surgery, survival benefit remained superior for higher-income HR = 0.641 (95% CI 0.478–0.858; p = 0.003) and MGMT methylated tumours HR = 0.167 (95% CI 0.084–0.331; p < 0.001). Conclusions: SES is an important determinant of prognosis in GBM even in the Italian National Health Service, which provides universal, largely free and relatively comprehensive healthcare. Despite aspirations to achieve equality in healthcare, socioeconomic differences exist and may impact the clinical outcome.
Tosoni Alicia; Gatto Lidia; Franceschi Enrico; Di Nunno Vincenzo; Lodi Raffaele; Mura Antonella; Di Battista Monica; Bartolini Stefania; Brandes Alba Ariela
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/867026
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