The discovery of the expression of opioid receptors in the skin and their role in orchestrating the process of tissue repair gave rise to questions regarding the potential effects of clinical morphine treatment in wound healing. Although short term treatment was reported to improve tissue regeneration, in vivo chronic administration was associated to an impairment of the physiological healing process and systemic fibrosis. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) play a fundamental role in tissue regeneration. In this regard, acute morphine exposition was recently reported to impact negatively on the functional characteristics of hMSCs, but little is currently known about its long-term effects. To determine how a prolonged treatment could impair their functional characteristics, we exposed hMSCs to increasing morphine concentrations respectively for nine and eighteen days, evaluating in particular the fibrogenic potential exerted by the long-term exposition. Our results showed a time dependent cell viability decline, and conditions compatible with a cellular senescent state. Ultrastructural and protein expression analysis were indicative of increased autophagy, suggesting a relation to a detoxification activity. In addition, the enhanced transcription observed for the genes involved in the synthesis and regulation of type I collagen suggested the possibility that a prolonged morphine treatment might exert its fibrotic potential risk, even involving the hMSCs.

Assessment of the structural and functional characteristics of human mesenchymal stem cells associated with a prolonged exposure of morphine

Teti G.;Ruggeri A.;Chiarini F.;Giorgetti A.;Mazzotti M. C.;Fais P.;Falconi M.
2021

Abstract

The discovery of the expression of opioid receptors in the skin and their role in orchestrating the process of tissue repair gave rise to questions regarding the potential effects of clinical morphine treatment in wound healing. Although short term treatment was reported to improve tissue regeneration, in vivo chronic administration was associated to an impairment of the physiological healing process and systemic fibrosis. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) play a fundamental role in tissue regeneration. In this regard, acute morphine exposition was recently reported to impact negatively on the functional characteristics of hMSCs, but little is currently known about its long-term effects. To determine how a prolonged treatment could impair their functional characteristics, we exposed hMSCs to increasing morphine concentrations respectively for nine and eighteen days, evaluating in particular the fibrogenic potential exerted by the long-term exposition. Our results showed a time dependent cell viability decline, and conditions compatible with a cellular senescent state. Ultrastructural and protein expression analysis were indicative of increased autophagy, suggesting a relation to a detoxification activity. In addition, the enhanced transcription observed for the genes involved in the synthesis and regulation of type I collagen suggested the possibility that a prolonged morphine treatment might exert its fibrotic potential risk, even involving the hMSCs.
SCIENTIFIC REPORTS
Carano F.; Teti G.; Ruggeri A.; Chiarini F.; Giorgetti A.; Mazzotti M.C.; Fais P.; Falconi M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/863048
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