Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides (FMF) is a rare variant of Mycosis Fungoides involving the scalp leading to alopecia. The clinical and trichoscopic features in 18 patients were analyzed and compared with the reports in the literature. Gender, age, disease stage, site of onset were taken into consideration. Clinical and trichoscopic analyses were performed on each patient. From a clinical point of view, Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides lesions involving the scalp presented as generalized alopecia (27.8%) or patchy-plaque alopecia (72.2%). Trichoscopic analysis revealed six most frequent features: single hair (83.3%), dotted dilated vessels (77.8%), broken-dystrophic hairs (66.7%), vellus hairs (61.1%), spermatozoa-like pattern vessels (55.6%), and yellow dots (55.6%). Additional identified trichoscopic patterns were dilation of follicular openings, scales-crusts, purpuric dots, short hair with split-end, pigtail hairs, perifollicular hyperkeratosis, milky-white globules, black dots, white dots/lines and absence of follicular dots. These trichoscopic features were further correlated to clinical presentations and stage of the disease. The rarity of the disease is a limitation. The relatively high number of patients allowed to identify several clinical and trichoscopic patterns that could be featured as specific or highly suspicious for FMF in order to consider trichoscopy as a complementary diagnostic approach and improve the differential diagnoses between FMF and other scalp disorders.

Clinical and trichoscopic features in 18 cases of Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides with scalp involvement

Pileri A.;Starace M.;Alessandrini A.;Guglielmo A.;Piraccini B. M.
2021

Abstract

Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides (FMF) is a rare variant of Mycosis Fungoides involving the scalp leading to alopecia. The clinical and trichoscopic features in 18 patients were analyzed and compared with the reports in the literature. Gender, age, disease stage, site of onset were taken into consideration. Clinical and trichoscopic analyses were performed on each patient. From a clinical point of view, Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides lesions involving the scalp presented as generalized alopecia (27.8%) or patchy-plaque alopecia (72.2%). Trichoscopic analysis revealed six most frequent features: single hair (83.3%), dotted dilated vessels (77.8%), broken-dystrophic hairs (66.7%), vellus hairs (61.1%), spermatozoa-like pattern vessels (55.6%), and yellow dots (55.6%). Additional identified trichoscopic patterns were dilation of follicular openings, scales-crusts, purpuric dots, short hair with split-end, pigtail hairs, perifollicular hyperkeratosis, milky-white globules, black dots, white dots/lines and absence of follicular dots. These trichoscopic features were further correlated to clinical presentations and stage of the disease. The rarity of the disease is a limitation. The relatively high number of patients allowed to identify several clinical and trichoscopic patterns that could be featured as specific or highly suspicious for FMF in order to consider trichoscopy as a complementary diagnostic approach and improve the differential diagnoses between FMF and other scalp disorders.
Gallo G.; Pileri A.; Starace M.; Alessandrini A.; Guglielmo A.; Ribero S.; Quaglino P.; Piraccini B.M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/833615
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