Motivational interviewing (MI) is devised to change unhealthy behaviors by increasing motivation. We adapted MI to a group format for the treatment of relapse during the behavioral treatment of obesity and performed a clinical audit to evaluate its effectiveness in stopping weight regain. The program was structured in seven weekly sessions, plus a 6-month follow-up. Patients (n = 86) completed a questionnaire on motivation to change in both healthy diet and physical activity, and a self-reported measurement of calorie intake and physical activity at baseline, at program end and at 6-month follow-up. The attendance to the program was high, with only 13 patients (15%) not completing the program and 24% not attending the 6-month follow-up. By the end of follow up, the prevalence of patients in either precontemplation or contemplation was reduced from over 60% at enrollment to approximately 20%, whereas the sum of patients in action or maintenance stages was increased from 9.5% in healthy diet and 14% in physical activity to 39.7% and 41.3%, respectively. These changes translated into significant behavioral changes (mean calorie intake, −13%; total physical activity, +125%; sedentary time, −8%) and finally into reduced body weight (−3%). We conclude that MI programs adapted for groups may be used to stop relapse in individuals following a behavioral intervention for obesity.

Motivational interviewing adapted to group setting for the treatment of relapse in the behavioral therapy of obesity. A clinical audit

Centis E.;Petroni M. L.;Cioni M.;Marchesini G.
2020

Abstract

Motivational interviewing (MI) is devised to change unhealthy behaviors by increasing motivation. We adapted MI to a group format for the treatment of relapse during the behavioral treatment of obesity and performed a clinical audit to evaluate its effectiveness in stopping weight regain. The program was structured in seven weekly sessions, plus a 6-month follow-up. Patients (n = 86) completed a questionnaire on motivation to change in both healthy diet and physical activity, and a self-reported measurement of calorie intake and physical activity at baseline, at program end and at 6-month follow-up. The attendance to the program was high, with only 13 patients (15%) not completing the program and 24% not attending the 6-month follow-up. By the end of follow up, the prevalence of patients in either precontemplation or contemplation was reduced from over 60% at enrollment to approximately 20%, whereas the sum of patients in action or maintenance stages was increased from 9.5% in healthy diet and 14% in physical activity to 39.7% and 41.3%, respectively. These changes translated into significant behavioral changes (mean calorie intake, −13%; total physical activity, +125%; sedentary time, −8%) and finally into reduced body weight (−3%). We conclude that MI programs adapted for groups may be used to stop relapse in individuals following a behavioral intervention for obesity.
NUTRIENTS
Centis E.; Petroni M.L.; Ghirelli V.; Cioni M.; Navacchia P.; Guberti E.; Marchesini G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/795586
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