Background: Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are crucial for neural and visual development after premature birth. Preterm infants usually require tube feeding (TF) until the achievement of adequate oral feeding skills; the impact of TF on DHA and AA delivery has not been investigated yet. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different TF techniques on the delivery of AA and DHA contained in human milk (HM). Methods: HM samples (65 mL each) were collected and divided into three 20-mL aliquots. The remaining 5 mL served as baseline. Three TF techniques were simulated (1 for each aliquot): gravity bolus feeding (BF), 3-hour continuous feeding using a horizontal feeding pump, and 3-hour continuous feeding with the feeding pump angled at 45°. For horizontal continuous feeding (HCF) and 45° angled continuous feeding (ACF), aliquots delivered between 0 and 90 minutes (T1) and 91 and 180 minutes (T2) were collected separately. AA and DHA concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and compared among the TF methods. DHA and AA delivery at T1 and T2 was also evaluated. Results: Fifty-one simulated feeds were performed. DHA and AA amounts after BF and ACF did not differ significantly compared with baseline, whereas HCF resulted in significantly lower DHA and AA concentration. During T2, ACF delivered almost twice the DHA and AA amounts compared with T1. Conclusion: The delivery of HM AA and DHA is significantly affected by TF, with potential clinical implications. When BF is not tolerated, ACF might represent a feasible alternative to reduce TF-related DHA and AA loss.

Effect of Different Tube Feeding Methods on the Delivery of Docosahexaenoic and Arachidonic Acid: An In Vitro Pilot Study

Martini Silvia
;
Aceti Arianna;Munarini Alessandra;La Riccia Cristina;Mantovani Vilma;Faldella Giacomo;Corvaglia Luigi
2019

Abstract

Background: Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are crucial for neural and visual development after premature birth. Preterm infants usually require tube feeding (TF) until the achievement of adequate oral feeding skills; the impact of TF on DHA and AA delivery has not been investigated yet. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different TF techniques on the delivery of AA and DHA contained in human milk (HM). Methods: HM samples (65 mL each) were collected and divided into three 20-mL aliquots. The remaining 5 mL served as baseline. Three TF techniques were simulated (1 for each aliquot): gravity bolus feeding (BF), 3-hour continuous feeding using a horizontal feeding pump, and 3-hour continuous feeding with the feeding pump angled at 45°. For horizontal continuous feeding (HCF) and 45° angled continuous feeding (ACF), aliquots delivered between 0 and 90 minutes (T1) and 91 and 180 minutes (T2) were collected separately. AA and DHA concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and compared among the TF methods. DHA and AA delivery at T1 and T2 was also evaluated. Results: Fifty-one simulated feeds were performed. DHA and AA amounts after BF and ACF did not differ significantly compared with baseline, whereas HCF resulted in significantly lower DHA and AA concentration. During T2, ACF delivered almost twice the DHA and AA amounts compared with T1. Conclusion: The delivery of HM AA and DHA is significantly affected by TF, with potential clinical implications. When BF is not tolerated, ACF might represent a feasible alternative to reduce TF-related DHA and AA loss.
Martini Silvia, Aceti Arianna, Furini Martina, Munarini Alessandra, La Riccia Cristina, Mantovani Vilma, Faldella Giacomo, Corvaglia Luigi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/687035
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